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Indian diaspora group ‘Indiaspora’ in Washington to host Inaugural Ball in 2017 for 45th President of US

California’s Attorney General Kamala Harris holds a fair chance of becoming the first Indian-American to be elected as a US Senator

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An Indian American. Flickr

Washington, Sept 17, 2016: An Indian Diaspora Group in America- ‘Indiaspora’ is going to organise an inaugural ball for the 45th President of the United States, which could be either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. The event is scheduled on January 18, next year in 2017 in Washington, DC.

The second presidential ball is being organised by Indian Diaspora, which would be attended by top Indian American personalities, US lawmakers and most probably the new president too.

This event would signify the emergence of the community, according to the event organisers. The event is to emphasise the importance and significance of the Indian-American community in the plight of Ameican politics.

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Indian American investor and philanthropist M R Rangaswami was found saying, ” This would be a bipartisan event to celebrate the success and significance of the Indian American community and to welcome in the new administration,” mentioned PTI.

https://twitter.com/NewsGram1/status/771253467058884608

According to the PTI reports, last time, the inaugural presidential ball was held in January 2013. Next year in 2017, there will be other things apart from inaugural ball, which will showcase the ascendancy and prominence of Indian-origin in the US, like yoga, Bollywood, and the Indian Cuisine.

Rangaswami hopes that the general elections would also result in the greater representation of the Indian Americans in the US Congress.

California’s Attorney General Kamala Harris holds a fair chance of becoming the first Indian-American to be elected as a US Senator.

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Also, apart from necessary congressman Ami Bera, from California, some other Indian American politicians of being elected to the US House of Representatives, including Raja Krishnamurthy from Illinois, Pramila Jayapal from Washington State and Ro Khanna from California are the prominent ones among them.

“We hope that after January, Indian-Americans could comprise of one percent of the members in the Congress,” Rangaswami added.

This event is of great importance for the Indian Diaspora living in America and will also symbolise its importance in American Political System.

– prepared by Arya Sharan of NewsGram. Twitter: @NoOffense9

  • Yokeshwari Manivel

    great! to see the indians development but this would also lead to decrease in indian economy than most of the indians will prefer to be in US as they are going to be recognised by law or political parties.

Next Story

Why Young Americans Are Not Moving A Lot Since The Great Recession

Young American adults are staying put more since the Great Recession, but when they do move, they’re not going to the same places as they did before the economic downturn

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US, America, Millennials, Migration
Frey, who keeps expecting millennial migration rates to pick up, is disappointed with the numbers. Wikimedia Commons

Young Americans are staying put more since the Great Recession, but when they do move, they’re not going to the same places as they did before the economic downturn of 2007-2009.

In the three years leading up to the recession, more Americans in their 20s and 30s headed to Riverside (California), Phoenix, Atlanta, Houston and Charlotte (North Carolina), according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

“Those were more kind of ‘We’re coming there to buy a house and get a job and make things go,’” says demographer William Frey of the Brookings Institution.

Things changed during the recession and in the years that followed.

From 2007 to 2012, America’s metro areas that gained the most millennials were Denver, Houston, Washington, D.C.; Austin (Texas) and Seattle. From 2012 to 2017, the metropolitan areas with the highest net millennial migration were Houston, Denver, Dallas, Seattle and Austin.

US, America, Millennials, Migration
Where US millennials are moving. VOA

“Young people may not be finding the job that they want and they’re not be able to buy a home that they’d like to buy,” Frey says. “At least they want to be in a place maybe where the action is for younger people, the kind with a young person’s amenities, or what you might call places with a cool factor.”

Overall, U.S. millennials are moving at the lowest rate since at least 1996. In 2017, their migration rate was 17%, well below the pre-recession number of almost 23%.

Frey, who keeps expecting millennial migration rates to pick up, is disappointed with the numbers.

“Migration is good for the economy in the sense that people are more able to adapt to changing economic circumstances… if they move to places where jobs are being created,” Frey says.

ALSO READ: US And Brazil Agree To Promote Development In The Amazon

“Especially if it’s a movement to purchase a home and to start investing in their future in terms of wealth creation and so forth. I think that’s important so that they’re not stuck in a way that makes them feel like they’re being left behind.”

Frey sees signs that millennials are starting to move to the suburbs and smaller metropolitan areas, as well as to cities located in the interior part of the United States rather than on either the East or West Coast.

“I’m suggesting that when we look at the next round of migration rates, when they come out, we’re going to see a little bit more movement to those kind of more, you know, economically viable and prosperous areas rather than to the cooler areas,” he says. (VOA)