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Indian Films fail to capture Quality Literature, says Indian-Origin Canadian Film Director Richie Mehta

"When I read a book from here, it boggles my mind with just how well written it is. But it doesn't translate to film scripts. The quality of Indian literature is not reflected in the quality of Indian scripts, by and large." says Richie Mehta

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Director Richie Mehta at the Miami International Film Festival. Wikimedia Commons
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Panaji, November 24, 2016: Richie Mehta, the Indian-origin Canadian film director feels that India has a very rich heritage of literature “on par with the world” but it is not reflected in the movies made in India.

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Richie, who is known for directing critically acclaimed films like “Siddharth”, and “Amal” says that he is highly impressed with the literary work in the country, but it is yet to find space in cinema.

According to PTI, he told the reporters, “When I read a book from here, it boggles my mind with just how well written it is. But it doesn’t translate to film scripts. The quality of Indian literature is not reflected in the quality of Indian scripts, by and large.”
“In order to survive as a viable industry, specially with the changing face of distribution, the script will always be important,” he added.

His recent project known as “India in a Day” was screened at the 47th edition of International Film Festival of India (IFFI).

Richie feels that there is an obvious disconnection between literature and films here, and that is not necessarily a criticism but it is more of his idea.

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“I’ve recently come to feel in this country one thing that excelled in the arts and cultural sectors is literature. The level of literature that has come out of the country in the past is unmatched in the word. It is on par with the rest of the world, easily…”

“But why is it that Indian literature is studied all over the world and Indian cinema is not. There is s disconnect there. This is not a criticism. This is an idea.”

The director acknowledges that writing for films and books are two completely different things.

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“When an Indian author writes his or her own book, it is their reflection. They only have their alphabets to work with, they know how to wield those letters.”

“But the language of cinema is much more complicated because you are wielding letters, images, every colour of the spectrum, every sound.”

“The distribution is already collapsing, we are seeing it in the studios here, they are all starting to not fund the big films. But a good script will pass through. It will get made.

prepared by NewsGram team with PTI inputs

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Trauma in Childhood is Linked to Negative Outcomes in Adulthood

"The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

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The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
A Child in pain, Pixabay

Do you want your children to be happy when they grow up? If yes, then you have to make sure that they are not experiencing any kind of trauma as a child. A new study, including an Indian-origin researcher, suggests that childhood trauma or adversity may trigger physical pain in adulthood.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.

“The findings suggest that early life trauma is leading to adults having more problems with mood and sleep, which in turn lead to them feeling more pain and feeling like pain is interfering with their day,” said co-author Ambika Mathur from the Pennsylvania State University.

But the connection was weaker in those who felt more optimistic and in control of their lives, the researcher said.

“The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

“They may be feeling the same amount or intensity of pain, but they’ve taken control of and are optimistic about not letting the pain interfere with their day,” Mathur added.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
Childhood Trauma can lead to pain in Adulthood, Pixabay

The findings build on previous research that suggests a link between adult physical pain and early-in-life trauma or adversity, which can include abuse or neglect, major illness, financial issues, or loss of a parent, among others, the researcher said.

For the current study, researchers recruited a diverse group of 265 participants who reported some form of adversity in their early lives.

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They answered questions about their early childhood or adolescent adversity, current mood, sleep disturbances, optimism, how in control of their lives they feel, and if they recently felt pain.

The researchers also looked at how optimism or feeling in control could affect how much pain a person experiences.

They found that while participants who showed these forms of resilience didn’t have as strong a connection between trouble sleeping and pain interfering with their day, the resilience didn’t affect the intensity of pain. (IANS)