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Indian migrant Ram Lubhaya deported for ‘abducting’ girl from a beach resort near Ragusa, Italy

In August, Justice minister Andrea Orlando has sent inspectors to the Ragusa city prosecutor’s office after Ram Lubhaya was caught trying to abduct a 5-year-old girl

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Child abduction (Representational Image). Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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Rome, September 7, 2016: Italy has deported a 43-year-old Indian migrant Ram Lubhaya who last month in August has tried to abduct a young girl from a beach resort near Ragusa in Italy.

Interior Minister Angelino Alfano said Lubhaya had been put on a plane from Rome to New Delhi. The incident took place on August 16. Last month, he was released because attempted kidnapping is a non-carcerable offence under Italian law, mentioned PTI reports.

In August, Justice minister Andrea Orlando has sent inspectors to the Ragusa city prosecutor’s office after Ram Lubhaya was caught trying to abduct a 5-year-old girl.

The girl’s parents had chased and fought with Lubhaya to get their child out of this clutch. Within an hour, Lubhaya was arrested based on eyewitness descriptions, reported ANSA news agency.

Prosecutor Giulia Bisello ordered the man – who has a criminal record, no residency permit, and currently makes a living by creating henna tattoos on the beach where he also sometimes spends the night – released without questioning.

Her decision sparked an outcry on social media and a wave of calls from concerned beachgoers to police emergency services, which prompted Bisello to track the suspect and get him arrested again.

However, after questioning him for several hours, the prosecutors ordered his release again, based on the legal code.

“This law makes me vomit,” said the child’s mother. “We were told the suspect did not conclude the crime — we were supposed to lose sight of him in order to say he kidnapped our little girl,” mentioned the PTI report.

The suspect, she said, only stopped “because we tackled him. He was holding her very tight, with her face almost in his armpit. We were hoping this person would be deported from Italy at least”.

While prosecutors’ decisions can’t be challenged, Orlando’s inspectors are tasked with assessing whether there were any “abnormalities or violations of the law that could be subject to disciplinary action”, the ministry said.

– prepared by NewsGram team 

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Japan Bans Smoking Inside Public Facilities, Seen By Critics as Pointless

The upper house approved and enacted the bill into law Wednesday after it was approved earlier by the lower house

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The law will be implemented in phases through April 2020. VOA

Japan on Wednesday approved its first national legislation banning smoking inside public facilities, but the watered-down measure excludes many restaurants and bars and is seen by critics as toothless.

The legislation aims to lower secondhand smoking risks ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics amid international calls for a smoke-free event. But ruling party lawmakers with strong ties to the tobacco and restaurant industries opted for a weakened version.

The upper house approved and enacted the bill into law Wednesday after it was approved earlier by the lower house.

Last month, Tokyo separately enacted a stricter ordinance banning smoking at all eateries that have employees, to protect them from secondhand smoke. The ordinance will cover about 84 percent of Tokyo restaurants and bars.

But the law still allows many exceptions and the Tokyo Games may not be fully smoke-free.

Japan often has been called a smokers’ paradise. Until now it has had no binding law controlling secondhand smoke and ranked among the least protected countries by the World Health Organization. That has brought pressure from international Olympic officials.

The new national law bans indoor smoking at schools, hospitals and government offices. Smoking will be allowed at existing small eateries, including those with less than 100 square meters (1,076 square feet) of customer space, which includes more than half of Japanese establishments. Larger and new eateries must limit smoking to designated rooms.

Violators can face fines of up to 300,000 yen ($2,700) for smokers and up to 500,000 yen ($4,500) for facility managers.

The law will be implemented in phases through April 2020.

Japan
The new national law bans indoor smoking at schools, hospitals and government offices. Pixabay

‘Too lenient’

The law allowing smoking at more than half of Japan’s restaurants as exceptions is inadequate, said Hiroyasu Muramatsu, a doctor serving on Tokyo’s anti-smoking committee. “The law is too lenient compared to international standards,” he told Japan’s NHK public television. “We need a full smoking ban.”

The health ministry’s initial draft bill called for stricter measures but faced opposition from lawmakers sympathetic to the restaurant industry. The government also was viewed as opposed to harsher measures because the former monopoly Japan Tobacco is still partly state-owned.

In Japan, almost a fifth of adults still smoke. The rate for men in their 30s to 50s is nearly twice as high, according to a government survey last year.

Also Read: Passive Smoking May Spike up Snoring Risk in Kids

Most office workers now light up only in smoking rooms or outdoors, and cities are gradually imposing limits on outdoor smoking in public areas. But most restaurants and bars in Japan allow smoking, making them the most common public source of secondhand smoke.

“Secondhand smoking has been largely considered an issue of the manners, but it’s not,” Kazuo Hasegawa, 47, a nonsmoker who has developed lung cancer, told NHK. “It’s about health hazards. It harms people. And I don’t want younger generations to have to suffer like me.”

In Japan, about 15,000 people, mainly women and children, die annually as a result of secondhand smoke, according to government and WHO estimates. (VOA)