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Indian Navy keen on fielding indigenous n-sub at international fleet review

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New Delhi: As the country gears up for the International Fleet Review (IFR), the Indian Navy is keen to ready the indigenous nuclear-powered submarine INS Arihant before the event, scheduled for February 2016.

INS Arihant, a 6,000-tonne submarine is at present undergoing sea trials and is likely to soon undertake weapon’s trials.

While the navy is tightlipped on INS Arihant’s participation in the International Fleet Review (IFR), a senior officer, on condition of anonymity, told IANS that efforts are on to get the boat ready before the event.

The officer, however, added that there will be no compromise with trials as safety is the primary concern.

“We want the submarine to be ready before the IFR. But, at the same time, there cannot be any compromise in the trials. Safety is of paramount importance,” the officer said.

“If it passes through all the trials before February, there will be nothing like it,” he said.

INS Arihant is the lead ship of India’s Arihant-class of nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines that was launched in 2009.

While it was initially expected to go on sea trials by 2012, this happened only last December.

Although the trials have been going fine since then, no stone is being left unturned to ensure the vessel is fully battle-ready.

“The trials are so far totally smooth. But there is no scope for mistakes; so we can only try that the boat is ready by year-end,” the officer said.

Asked if INS Arihant will participate in the IFR, the navy chief, Admiral R.K. Dhowan, at a press conference this week, said this was not certain.

Once inducted, the submarine will help the country complete its nuclear triad, giving it the capability to respond to nuclear strikes from sea, land and air-based systems.

The project is being undertaken under the advanced technology vessel (ATV) programme under the supervision of the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) and involving agencies and establishments such as the DRDO, the Department of Atomic Energy and the Submarine Design Group of the Directorate of Naval Design, besides companies such as L&T.

Its design is based on the Russian Akula-1 class submarine and its 83MW pressurised water reactor has been built with significant Russian assistance.

While its 100-member crew has been trained by Russian specialists, Indian scientists at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre have received significant expertise in reducing the size of the reactor to fit it into the submarine’s 10 metre diameter hull.

India currently operates the Russian-origin nuclear-powered submarine INS Chakra, which is on a 10-year lease since 2012.

Nuclear submarines have the capability to stay out in the sea for longer.
Over 50 countries are expected to participate in the International Fleet Review to be held February 4-8, 2016.
Some 90 ships are expected to participate in the review.
(Anjali Ojha, IANS)

 

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Women of America Are Stepping Up As Nuclear Energy Advocates

Nuclear power is clean, safe and better for the environment than some alternative energy sources

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Nuclear Energy
Engineering manager Kristin Zaitz and her co-worker Heather Matteson, a reactor operator, started Mothers for Nuclear. VOA
  • The availability of cheap natural gas and greater energy efficiency has reduced demand for nuclear energy in recent years
  • Nuclear power is clean, safe and better for the environment than some alternative energy sources
  • Industry experts say that women who work in nuclear power can be powerful advocates for nuclear

San Francisco, August 26, 2017: Kristin Zaitz is confident that her nuclear power plant is safe.

Zaitz, an engineering manager, was at Diablo Canyon Power Plant during both her pregnancies and has scuba dived to inspect the plant, which hugs the California coast. Zaitz wears a pendant with a tiny bit of uranium inside, an item that tends to invite questions.

“We all have our perceptions of nuclear,” Zaitz said.

In a few years, Diablo Canyon will close, part of a trend nationwide. The availability of cheap natural gas and greater energy efficiency has reduced demand for nuclear energy in recent years. Add to that ongoing concerns about public safety, such as those raised by memories of disasters at nuclear power plants in Fukushima, Japan, Chernobyl in Ukraine (then part of the Soviet Union) and Three Mile Island in the United States.

Nuclear is ‘cleaner’ than fossil fuels

Supporters of nuclear energy say that when a reactor-based generating station closes, not enough wind and solar power is available to make up the difference. They lament that energy companies tend to turn instead to fossil fuels — coal and natural gas — which produce environmentally harmful emissions.

Zaitz and her co-worker Heather Matteson, a reactor operator, started Mothers for Nuclear, their effort to get the word out that nuclear power is clean, safe and better for the environment than some alternative energy sources.

“I went into the plant very skeptical of nuclear and being scared of it,” said Matteson. “It took me six to seven years to really feel like this is something good for the environment. I don’t want people to take six to seven years to make that decision. We don’t have that long.”

Matteson, too, wears the uranium necklace as a conversation starter. “Nuclear is fun,” she said. Is there any radiation emitted by the pendant? “There’s slightly more than from a banana,” she conceded.

Also Read: Indian nuclear industry growing fast, says former Atomic Energy Commission chief

Women seen as powerful advocates

Industry experts say that women who work in nuclear power can be powerful advocates for nuclear. They can help change attitudes of other women who tend to be more skeptical than men about nuclear energy’s benefits.

At the recent U.S. Women in Nuclear conference in San Francisco, women working in the industry talked about how more should be done to make nuclear power’s case to the public, and how they may be the best suited to do it.

“As mothers, I think we also have an important role to play in letting the public know that we support nuclear for the future, for our children,” said Matteson. “And we don’t know other mothers supporting nuclear power in a vocal way. We thought there was a gap to fill.”

Young women say they look at careers in this industry because they are socially minded.

‘Do something good for the world’

“I went into this wanting to do something good for the world,” Lenka Kollar, business strategy director at NuScale, a firm in Oregon that designs and markets small modular reactors. “Wanting to bring power to people. There are still more than a billion people in the world who don’t have electricity.”

Critics of nuclear energy say it doesn’t matter who is promoting it.

“Using mothers’ voices to argue for a technology that is fundamentally dangerous and that has been demonstrated by disasters like Fukushima to be not safe for the communities that surround the power plants or even cities that are hundreds of miles away is disingenuous,” said Kendra Klein, a staff scientist with Friends of the Earth, an environmental group.

While the future of nuclear power in the United States may be uncertain, the women here say they have a positive story to tell. (VOA)

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TU-142M, a long range Maritime Patrol aircraft of Indian Navy decommissioned after 29 years of service arrives at Vizag to be converted into Museum

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TU-142M, a long range Maritime Patrol aircraft of Indian Navy decommissioned after 29 years of service arrives at Vizag , Wikimedia

Visakhapatnam, Apr 8, 2017: TU-142M, one of the long range Maritime Patrol aircraft of the Indian Navy which was decommissioned after 29 years of service, arrived here on Saturday, to be converted into a museum.

Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N. Chandrababu Naidu received the aircraft at INS Dega. He presented bouquets to the five-member crew as the aircraft landed for the final time.

Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Naval Command, Vice Admiral HCS Bisht and other officials attended the ceremony.

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Earlier, the aircraft took off from INS Rajali, the air station of the Indian Navy at Arakkonam, Tamil Nadu.

The TU-142M aircraft is the heaviest, fastest and highest flying Turbo prop in the world which had been the mainstay of long range maritime reconnaissance and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Operations of the Indian Navy for close to three decades.

Authorities were making preparation to convert the aircraft into a museum on the lines of Kursura Submarine Museum on the Beach Road here. It is expected to be ready on one acre of land on Beach Road by June. The entire project is expected to cost Rs 10 crore.

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Officials said the technical evaluation of tenders by five companies for converting the aircraft into a museum was completed and financial bid would be opened soon.

The aircraft would be dismantled at INS Dega and shifted to the site for assembling and converting it into a museum. The district authorities have finalised the tender for dismantling and shifting the aircraft. (IANS)

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Indian Navy bids farewell to TU 142M patrol aircraft

The end of Tupolev 142M's illustrious and successful career with the Indian Navy was marked by the de-induction of the aircraft

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navy
Tupolev 142M aircraft, wikimedia

Arakkonam, March 29: The Indian Navy’s long-range maritime patrol aircraft TU 142M, which played a key role in a number of key operations including the IPKF mission in Sri Lanka, was de-inducted today after a long run of accident-free service of 29 years.

The aircraft made in Russia was bid adieu by the Indian navy including its Chief Admiral Sunil Lanba at a ceremony at INS Rajali here, about 90 km from Chennai.

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The end of Tupolev 142M’s illustrious and successful career with the Navy was marked by the de-induction of the aircraft.

Tupolev 142M fleet is being replaced by 12 P-8I maritime surveillance aircraft of Boeing which are well-equipped with rockets, newly developed radars, harpoon anti-ship missiles, lightweight torpedoes, new generation sensors and much more advanced technology.

In 1988, TU 142M was introduced in the Navy at Dabolim in Goa from Russia. It shifted base to INS Rajali in 1992 and became a part of several naval exercises and operations in it’s long service-period.

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Praising and remembering the services of the TU 142M, Admiral Lanba mentioned the key role played by the aircraft in several missions involving the Indian Navy including the Indian Peace Keeping Force (IPKF) operations in Sri Lanka in the late 1980s.

For Lanba and the navy, TU 142M stands as a proud symbol of pride and might, adding that the de-induction ceremony was an emotional moment for the personnel involved with it.

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According to PTI reports, he also mentioned that P-8i with its modern technology including new-generation sensors and radars will be a “force multiplier.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter: @dubumerang