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12-year-old Indian-Origin Boy Rahul Wins UK Child Genius Show

Rahul clinched the title by answering a question on 19th Century artists William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais

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Child Genius show
Indian Origin boy wins Child Genius show. Pixabay
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  • A 12-year-old Indian-origin boy from north London has won the Child Genius show
  • He clinched the title by answering a question on 19th Century artists William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais
  • Rahul’s chosen subject was Edward Jenner’s medical innovation and methodology in 18th Century England

London, Aug 20, 2017: An 12-year-old Indian-origin boy from north London has won the Child Genius show broadcast by UK’s Channel 4, the media reported on Sunday.

Rahul, who lives in Barnet, beat his nine-year-old opponent, Ronan, 10-4 in the programme’s finale on Saturday night, the BBC reported.

Rahul, who has an IQ high enough to be a member of Mensa, the world’s largest and oldest high IQ society, fought off competition from 19 children aged eight to 12 in the week-long show.

He clinched the title by answering a question on 19th Century artists William Holman Hunt and John Everett Millais.

In the final, Rahul’s chosen subject was Edward Jenner’s medical innovation and methodology in 18th Century England. He and Ronan both scored 15 in their specialist fields.

Rahul said he was “extremely delighted to win” and congratulated Ronan and the other contestants, the BBC reported.

He had impressed audiences and quizmaster Richard Osman in the first round on Monday by answering every question he was asked correctly.

Rahul’s father, Minesh is an IT manager and mother Komal, a pharmacist. They entered him into the competition and called his success a “phenomenal achievement”. (IANS)

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Trauma in Childhood is Linked to Negative Outcomes in Adulthood

"The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

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The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
A Child in pain, Pixabay

Do you want your children to be happy when they grow up? If yes, then you have to make sure that they are not experiencing any kind of trauma as a child. A new study, including an Indian-origin researcher, suggests that childhood trauma or adversity may trigger physical pain in adulthood.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.

“The findings suggest that early life trauma is leading to adults having more problems with mood and sleep, which in turn lead to them feeling more pain and feeling like pain is interfering with their day,” said co-author Ambika Mathur from the Pennsylvania State University.

But the connection was weaker in those who felt more optimistic and in control of their lives, the researcher said.

“The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

“They may be feeling the same amount or intensity of pain, but they’ve taken control of and are optimistic about not letting the pain interfere with their day,” Mathur added.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
Childhood Trauma can lead to pain in Adulthood, Pixabay

The findings build on previous research that suggests a link between adult physical pain and early-in-life trauma or adversity, which can include abuse or neglect, major illness, financial issues, or loss of a parent, among others, the researcher said.

For the current study, researchers recruited a diverse group of 265 participants who reported some form of adversity in their early lives.

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They answered questions about their early childhood or adolescent adversity, current mood, sleep disturbances, optimism, how in control of their lives they feel, and if they recently felt pain.

The researchers also looked at how optimism or feeling in control could affect how much pain a person experiences.

They found that while participants who showed these forms of resilience didn’t have as strong a connection between trouble sleeping and pain interfering with their day, the resilience didn’t affect the intensity of pain. (IANS)

 

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