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Indian-origin boy working with Microsoft to launch low-cost Braille printer ‘Braigo’ in November

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Shubham Banerjee, a 13-year-old Indian-origin boy, who had invented a low cost portable Braille printer using his Lego toys, is working with IT giant Microsoft to integrate his invention with Windows to make it easily accessible to the visually impaired.

Shubham is an eighth grade student of Santa Clara school in California. He has already started his own company Braigo Labs, which made him the youngest entrepreneur of the world.

His mother Malini is the president of the company and father Neil is Shubham’s mentor.

“I discovered that typical Braille printers cost about $2,000 (about Rs 126,000) or even more, and I felt that was unnecessarily expensive for someone already at a disadvantage,” Banerjee said.

“So, I put my brain to work, and the first thing that came to mind was to create an alternative using my favorite toy,” he added.

The new printer is cheap and consumer friendly, and is 75% lower in price than that of the existing ones.

He has also got an invitation from Microsoft to showcase his new printer Braigo 2.0.

“Our relationship with Microsoft will help Braigo achieve a seamless experience for a visually-impaired person who wants to use a computer at home or at the office to print documents for offline reading,” said Banerjee.

“Also, think about the banks, the government institutions or even the libraries where Windows-based computers are widely used. They will all benefit from having a Braigo to provide accessibility services to their visually impaired customers,” he added.

According to a report, the new product will be available in the market soon with a price tag of $500.

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California to Require Public Universities to Offer Abortion Pills at Campus Health Centers

California's Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday signed the bill into law, which requires the states' 34 universities to offer abortion medication beginning]

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California, Public, Universities
FILE - People rally in support of abortion rights at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., May 21, 2019. VOA

California has become the first state to require public universities to offer abortion pills at campus health centers.

California’s Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday signed the bill into law, which requires the states’ 34 universities to offer abortion medication beginning in 2023.

The medication is a first-trimester procedure that involves a woman taking two pills to create an effect similar to a miscarriage.

Newsom’s predecessor, Jerry Brown, who is also a Democrat, vetoed similar legislation last year, arguing that abortion services were “widely available off-campus” and so did not need to be provided by state universities.

California, Public, Universities
FILE – California Gov. Gavin Newsom addresses a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., July 23, 2019. VOA

Democratic Senator Connie Leyva, who sponsored the bill, said in a statement Friday, “Abortion is a protected right, and it is important that everyone, including college students, have access to that right, if they so choose.”

Leyva has argued the bill would help young women who cannot get to outside abortion providers because of transportation or financial obstacles.

The bill has been opposed by religious and anti-abortion groups.

The University of California system has not taken a position on the matter but has raised concerns about the cost of the procedure as well as concerns over security issues related to providing abortions.

Also Read- Light Smoking also Damages Lungs, Says Study

The law does not require California universities to offer surgical abortions, which can be done past the first trimester.

Abortion medication can only be administered during the first trimester. It is different from the morning after pill, which is already available at many university health centers across the country. The morning after pill is taken after sex to block a pregnancy before it begins, while abortion medication ends a pregnancy after it has begun.

California’s decision to increase access to abortion comes at a time when many states are limiting the ability of women to receive abortions, leading to a flurry of legal challenges. Last week, the Supreme Court agreed to review a Louisiana law that opponents say would force most of the abortion clinics in the state to close. (VOA)