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Indian-origin lawyer Nathan Desai with Nazi sympathies shot nine people in US

Nathan Desai, the Indian-origin lawyer, during the 20-minute shooting spree, was wearing a military-style clothing with Nazi symbols where he fired at passing cars

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  • Nathan Desai, the Indian-origin lawyer, during the 20-minute shooting spree, was wearing a military-style clothing with Nazi symbols where he fired at passing cars
  • The shooter’s father, Prakash Desai told that his son was not keeping well because his law practice and was also worried
  • Almost all the victims survived but one of them was critically wounded and five others were hospitalised, the police informed

New York, 27 September, 2016: On Monday, a lawyer of Indian-origin with apparent Nazi sympathies went on a rampage in US’ Houston city, he shot nine people before he was himself killed by police, according to authorities.

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Nathan Desai, the Indian-origin lawyer, during the 20-minute shooting spree, was wearing a military-style clothing with Nazi symbols where he fired at passing cars.

Police said that  they had no idea why Desai went on the rampage hitting people at random.

Desai’s name was written with capital ‘s’  in media reports in Houston, to make it sound European, but his father was identified as Prakash Desai.

Nathan Desai. Facebook
Nathan Desai. Facebook

Current foreign news says, almost all the victims survived but one of them was critically wounded and five others were hospitalised, the police informed.

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The shooter’s father, Prakash Desai told KPRC TV that his son was not keeping well because his law practice and was also worried.

46-year-old Nathan Desai owned several guns to protect himself against his clients. His father added, his clients were funny and criminally-minded people

This is the second mass shooting by a person of Indian descent in the US.

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In 2003, Biswanath Halder, at the Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, went on a rampage, taking hostages, killed a graduate student and wounded others as well as a professor.

He was captured alive and was sentenced to life after a trial. (IANS)

 

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  • starscream

    How the fuck does a capital S make it sound European?? WTF??!! STUPID!!

  • Enakshi Roy Chowdhury

    this is a sad news, dont know what to say about this.. seems people are very happy killing each other and then dying themselves

Next Story

Trauma in Childhood is Linked to Negative Outcomes in Adulthood

"The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

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The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
A Child in pain, Pixabay

Do you want your children to be happy when they grow up? If yes, then you have to make sure that they are not experiencing any kind of trauma as a child. A new study, including an Indian-origin researcher, suggests that childhood trauma or adversity may trigger physical pain in adulthood.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.

“The findings suggest that early life trauma is leading to adults having more problems with mood and sleep, which in turn lead to them feeling more pain and feeling like pain is interfering with their day,” said co-author Ambika Mathur from the Pennsylvania State University.

But the connection was weaker in those who felt more optimistic and in control of their lives, the researcher said.

“The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

“They may be feeling the same amount or intensity of pain, but they’ve taken control of and are optimistic about not letting the pain interfere with their day,” Mathur added.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
Childhood Trauma can lead to pain in Adulthood, Pixabay

The findings build on previous research that suggests a link between adult physical pain and early-in-life trauma or adversity, which can include abuse or neglect, major illness, financial issues, or loss of a parent, among others, the researcher said.

For the current study, researchers recruited a diverse group of 265 participants who reported some form of adversity in their early lives.

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They answered questions about their early childhood or adolescent adversity, current mood, sleep disturbances, optimism, how in control of their lives they feel, and if they recently felt pain.

The researchers also looked at how optimism or feeling in control could affect how much pain a person experiences.

They found that while participants who showed these forms of resilience didn’t have as strong a connection between trouble sleeping and pain interfering with their day, the resilience didn’t affect the intensity of pain. (IANS)