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Indian-origin MP becomes first Australian politician to take oath on Bhagavad Gita

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Indian-origin Daniel Mookhey became the first politician to be sworn in to an Australian Parliament on the Gita.

32-year-old Mookhey was elected by the Labor party, to fill the vacancy left by Steve Whan’s departure, in the New South Wales upper house.

“It is an honour and a privilege to be the first Australian politician to take the oath on The Gita,” Mookhey said, as reported by IBN Live.

He reportedly added that the Gita is one of the world’s greatest religious texts, along with Bible, Quran and Torah.

Mookhey is originally from Punjab, from where his parents had migrated to Australia in 1973.

Mookhey is not the only Hindu politician who has made his name in politics of foreign countries. Recently Tulsi Gabbard was listed among the 25 most accomplished and influential female leaders in the United States Congress.

In a report by PTI, it was reported that despite being in Congress for just two years, Gabbard was able to work with Democrats and Republicans. She was one of the leading voices on military and foreign affairs on both the House Armed Services Committee and the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Both these young Hindu leaders have made a prominent mark in the politics of their respective countries.

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Trauma in Childhood is Linked to Negative Outcomes in Adulthood

"The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

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The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
A Child in pain, Pixabay

Do you want your children to be happy when they grow up? If yes, then you have to make sure that they are not experiencing any kind of trauma as a child. A new study, including an Indian-origin researcher, suggests that childhood trauma or adversity may trigger physical pain in adulthood.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.

“The findings suggest that early life trauma is leading to adults having more problems with mood and sleep, which in turn lead to them feeling more pain and feeling like pain is interfering with their day,” said co-author Ambika Mathur from the Pennsylvania State University.

But the connection was weaker in those who felt more optimistic and in control of their lives, the researcher said.

“The participants who felt more optimistic or in control of their lives may have been better at waking up with pain but somehow managing not to let it ruin their day.

“They may be feeling the same amount or intensity of pain, but they’ve taken control of and are optimistic about not letting the pain interfere with their day,” Mathur added.

The findings, published in the Journal of Behavioural Medicine, suggested that experiencing trauma or adversity in childhood or adolescence was linked with mood or sleep problems in adulthood.
Childhood Trauma can lead to pain in Adulthood, Pixabay

The findings build on previous research that suggests a link between adult physical pain and early-in-life trauma or adversity, which can include abuse or neglect, major illness, financial issues, or loss of a parent, among others, the researcher said.

For the current study, researchers recruited a diverse group of 265 participants who reported some form of adversity in their early lives.

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They answered questions about their early childhood or adolescent adversity, current mood, sleep disturbances, optimism, how in control of their lives they feel, and if they recently felt pain.

The researchers also looked at how optimism or feeling in control could affect how much pain a person experiences.

They found that while participants who showed these forms of resilience didn’t have as strong a connection between trouble sleeping and pain interfering with their day, the resilience didn’t affect the intensity of pain. (IANS)

 

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