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Indian policy of taming poverty with growth ‘a model for others’

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United Nations: India’s success in eradicating poverty through sustained economic growth will be a model for other developing countries, the UN’s Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) was told.

“India’s success in sustaining robust economic growth to eradicate poverty will bring forth technologies and pathways to progress that can be shared with other developing countries to enable them to also achieve sustainable development,” India’s delegate Mansukh L. Mandaviya said on Monday.

Mandaviya, a Bharatiya Janata Party member of the Rajya Sabha from Gujarat who is also member of the Indian delegation to the UN, added that India’s success “will contribute in no small measure to the global achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)”.

The SDG adopted at the summit of world leaders last month has set a target of eliminating poverty by 2030. Of 896 million people worldwide who lived on less than $1.90 a day — the international poverty level — 259.5 million or 29 percent were in India, according to statistics cited by the World Bank. Therefore, India’s success in eradicating poverty would contribute significantly to achieving the SDG.

To achieve this goal, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government “has renewed its efforts to return India to a high growth trajectory, promote job rich industrial development through rapid skill development of our young populace, promote financial inclusion, protection and welfare of the girl child, agricultural renovation, and a massive drive for improved sanitation,” Mandaviya said.

However, Mandaviya linked the high growth trajectory to the goals of protecting the environment and fighting climate change.

“Modi has spoken of achieving the same level of development, prosperity and well being without going down the path of reckless consumption and his belief is that by doing so, it doesn’t necessarily mean that our economies will suffer, but rather that they will take on a different character,” he said.

As “evidence of our seriousness for addressing the environmental sustainability of our growth”, Mandaviya cited India’s plans to add 175 gigawatts of clean and renewable energy, make its energy-use 33 to 35 percent more efficient by 2030, and create additional forest resources capable of absorbing 2.5 billion to 3 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide.

“Even though we did not create the (climate change) problem, India has every intention of being a part of the solution when it comes to climate change,” Mandaviya said.

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Pakistan Exploits Situation In Jammu & Kashmir: India

India has accused Pakistan of cynically exploiting the situation in Jammu and Kashmir at the General Assembly

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Pakistan Exploits Situation In Jammu & Kashmir: India
Pakistan Exploits Situation In Jammu & Kashmir: India. flickr

India has accused Pakistan of cynically exploiting the situation in Jammu and Kashmir at the General Assembly while it was discussing an important issue.

“Such cynical attempts have failed in the past and do not find any resonance in this body,” Sandeep Kumar Bayyapu, a First Secretary in India’s UN Mission, said on Monday.

He was replying to a reference to Kashmir made by Pakistan’s Permanent Representative Maleeha Lodhi during a debate on the Right to Protect People against crimes against humanity.

“While we are having this serious debate for the first time in a decade on an issue that is of importance to all of us, we have witnessed that one delegation has, yet again, misused this platform to make an unwarranted reference to the situation in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir,” Bayyapu said.

“I would like to place on record and reiterate that the state of Jammu and Kashmir is an integral and inalienable part of India. No amount of empty rhetoric from Pakistan will change this reality,” he added.

Lodhi had said that many of the victims of killings and “mass-blinding” are “in Indian-occupied Jammu and Kashmir” and that they “have the further indignity of living under an illegal and alien occupation”.

Pakistan's Permanent Representative Maleeha Lodhi
Pakistan’s Permanent Representative Maleeha Lodhi. flickr

“Against this backdrop, calls for accountability would invariably smack of double standards and selectivity, especially when egregious crimes including killings and mass-blinding are being committed in full view of the international community,” she said.

However, Lodhi also said: “At its core, the responsibility to protect, is not a license to intervene in external situations, but, is instead, a universal principle of ‘non-indifference’, in keeping with historical context and cultural norms of respective settings.”

Also read: Women-Driven Rickshaw Program Creating Sensation in Pakistan

“We should also be mindful that the notion of ‘Responsibility to Protect’ does not become a mere re-enactment of the discredited ‘humanitarian interventions’ of the past,” she added. (IANS)

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