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Indian Premier League: 5 reasons why it is right to call it India ka Tyohar!

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Image: BCCL

By Piyush Kumar

It is beyond any doubt that Indian Premier League- the self proclaimed ‘India ka Tyohaar’ (Festival of India) is a success story. It is a money minting tool for the organizers and participating players; at the same time, it is a dose of adrenaline and excitement to the viewers and fans. Though, marred by various controversies, from match-fixing to public brawls, somehow, IPL resurfaces every year with the same fanfare. Let us leave aside the negative aspects for today and focus on the positives it has brought.

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Image: BCCI

 

Short-cut to glory

IPL has been a boon to less known or unknown players from different regions. One brilliant knock and a player erupts on the glorious side of fame. Sarfaraz Khan, a 17 year old teenager, hogged the limelight with a single innings of 21-ball 45. It paid off immediately with former England player David Lloyd’s tweet, urging English County teams to rope him in.

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Image: BCCI

 

Super entertainment in 40 overs

Whether a CEO tired of enduring corporate pressure or a research scholar who has performed failed experiments throughout the day, all need something to cheer them up by dinner time. IPL takes up that perfect slot with 40 overs of non-stop entertainment. So what if rumors of pre-fixed matches prevail. Who cares! Don’t we enjoy scripted movies and plays? Moreover, the sight of cheerleaders dancing on boundaries does cheer up gloomy faces! A tired person just wants some stress buster at the end of the day. IPL succeeds in doing that.

Image: BCCI
Image: BCCI

No Infidelity issues!

IPL is great for both – fans and general viewers. We all have one or two favorite players in each team. One can enjoy sixes of Chris Gayle in spite of being a supporter of Rajasthan Royals or Chennai Super Kings. This makes IPL unique. And one can always shift sides and start cheering for the winning team. No hard luck involved and always a win-win situation for viewers like me who stays away from fanatics.

Image: BCCI

 

 

Expanse of cricket infrastructure

With the inclusion of more teams, cricket will expand beyond big cities. This will not only provide more opportunity to local lads, but also lead to development of stadium and other infrastructure needed for the expanse of cricket.

Image: BCCL
Image: BCCL

Progress of other sports

IPL has shown how money minting and sports revolution can be carried out at the same time. The success of IPL is now being emulated in other sports and games. The success of Pro-Kabaddi and Indian Super League (Football) means that the largely neglected players from sports other than cricket can also be rewarded with money and fame. Such forays into more such games will follow soon.

 

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  • Very-well structured article highlighting the advantages of IPL, and justifying why IPL hogging all prime time slots in most households!

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Will the exciting lineup of new IPL Players get to play in the 2019 Cricket World Cup?

The bench strength looks impressive, but it has to be tested sooner than later.

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When will the exciting IPL stars get a chance if others are allowed to consolidate their positions playing at home? Pixabay

-by Veturi Srivatsa

New Delhi, October 23, 2017 :
 So much of cricket is being played around the world — Tests, One-Day Internationals and Twenty20s. The so-called pecking order is going for a toss with each passing series.

India, who got to the No. 1 position in the One-Day Internationals after beating Australia, vacated it for South Africa who went up beating Bangladesh.

Bangladesh are still playing in South Africa, Sri Lanka in the Gulf, home of Pakistan, and New Zealand are in India for a series each in the two shorter formats. Australia are getting ready for the Ashes and the South Africans will be looking forward to settling a score with India.

Every international side is seriously looking to the 2019 World Cup, building their core component, or is it rebuilding with less than two years for the mega event. Some top cricketers around the world are happy playing in the shorter formats to prolong their careers and with an eye on the pay packages.

There was a time good Test cricketers used to move into the One-Day format on the strength of their technique and fitness. Players now look to get into the Test squad on the weight of their performance in the ODIs. Both the players and the selectors are striking a blance between the long duration domestic cricket and the Twenty20 Indian Premier League (IPL).

India are going through a peculiar renaissance of sorts. Players who are thought to be indispensable not long ago are being rested, rotated and dropped whichever way one wants to take the selectors’ and team management’s perspective.

Not one or two players, practically the entire Test attack is banished to domestic cricket. Ravichandran Ashwin, Ajay Jadeja, Mohammed Shami and Umesh Yadav are playing in the ongoing Ranji Trophy just to keep them in the loop. Jadeja is, with a vengeance, scoring hundreds and taking wickets.

The captain and chief coach Ravi Shastri seem to be calling the shots. Virat Kohli, like his predecessor Mahendra Singh Dhoni, is slowly seeing the back of senior cricketers who he feels are slow coaches in the field, Jadeja being the exception. Both Jadeja and Ashwin had to go out for their inability to take wickets in the middle-overs on a regular basis.

Chinaman Kuldeep Yadav and legspinner Yuzvendra Chahal are providing the variety in the attack and importantly they are taking wickets bowling at any stage of the match. Axar Patel is doing the backup job. If Ashwin and Jadeja are in consideration for 2019, then they should also get to bowl a lot of overs before their fate is decided once and for all.

If there are four players good enough to open the innings, none of them is being considered for a middle-order position. Actually, Lokesh Rahul is the man the team management wants to keep him in the squad. He also prefers to open the innings and he just couldn’t adjust at No.4 behind Kohli. Hardik Pandya was tried at four and looked good in one match and then he became a floater, pushing Dhoni up and down.

Ajinkya Rahane continues to be a stop-gap opener, getting an opportunity whenever Rohit Sharma or Shikhar Dhawan are out through injuries. Strangely, he is not seen as a middle-order bat after an impression was created that he cannot rotate the strike, though it was during his early years in international cricket.

The other middle-order slots are now with Kedar Jadhav and Manish Pandey, both have good performances and the powers that be think the two should to be nursed, particularly Jadhav who is not only a handy bowler but also a decent wicket-keeper in an emergency. Rahul is another who keen keep wickets. Amazingly, the squad to play New Zealand has a regular wicket-keeper, Dinesh Karthik as a batsman. He is also seen as a contender for the No.4 position.

Kohli continues to be the man to hold both the top order and in the middle, more so while chasing. His record is amazing going into his 200th match on Sunday against New Zealand in Mumbai. He has 12 hundreds more than Sachin Tendulkar and Sourav Ganguly who had 18 each at the very stage of their careers.

Kohli’s faith in Dhoni as his onfield consultant gives a totally different connotation to captaincy. None of the Fab Four or Five ever looked demonstrably carrying the side as Dhoni looks today. The arrangement is working out perfectly fine. The two are pulling the the youngsters in the side with them to give them confidence.

When will the exciting IPL stars get a chance if others are allowed to consolidate their positions playing at home? When will Rishab Pant, Sanju Samson, Shreyas Iyer, Nitish Rana or someone like all-rounder Washington Sundar and fast bowler Mohammad Siraj get a look in?

The bench strength looks impressive, but it has to be tested sooner than later.

(Editorial note : This article has been written by Veturi Srivatsa, a senior journalist and was first published at IANS. The views expressed are personal. He can be reached at sveturi@gmail.com)