Tuesday June 25, 2019
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Indian soldiers honored by America at war memorial

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US-India

By NewsGram Staff Writer

On Tuesday, 85,000 Indian soldiers, who sacrificed their lives fighting the Axis powers, were honored by the US government at a memorial of the victims of World War II. US officials also expressed their views on the current dreadful scenarios being faced by the world in the form of terrorism.

India’s Deputy Permanent Representative, Bhagwant S. Bishnoi, at the General Assembly commemoration said, “India has been a land of warriors since its inception, and holds a philosophy that good always rules evil which has also guided their code of warrior.”

“The number of Indians, who joined the armed forces was 2.5 million, is the largest volunteer force ever raised in history”, he further added.

The massive threat to peace nowadays is the formation of new emerging terrorist organizations with an aim of promoting terrorism and fetching global attention.

Terrorism is a global phenomenon that can only be defeated by the global actions.

Highlighting the contribution of Indian soldiers in World War II, Bishnoi also focused on the role of Indian women who left their homes with a motive to safeguard people and acted as nurses and joined the Women’s Auxiliary Corps.

The Indian Women’s Auxiliary Corps was formed in 1942, and over 11,500 women had volunteered to serve in it.

“During the evacuation of Myanmar–then called Burma–Indian women often stayed at their posts and continued to send vital messages over the telegraph lines to help ensure the escape of as many civilians as possible. Many died and many were captured to endure terrible hardship and deprivation in prisoner-of-war camps,” he concluded.

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Myanmar Early Release of Soldiers Involved in Rohingya Massacre Draws Criticism from Rights Activists

The soldiers served less time than two Reuters reporters who were jailed for exposing the massacre

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rohingya massacre, myanmar
Rakhine State, Myanmar. VOA

Myanmar’s early release of seven soldiers who were jailed for killing a group of Rohingya Muslims is drawing criticism from rights activists. Four officers and three enlisted service members were freed last November, Reuters first reported, after being sentenced in 2018 to 10 years in prison with hard labor for killing 10 Rohingya men and boys the year before.

Prisons department head Myint Soe confirmed to reporters Tuesday in Yangon the soldiers were “no longer in custody,” but he declined to provide more information.

The soldiers served less time than two Reuters reporters who were jailed for exposing the massacre. Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo were jailed last September after being sentenced to seven years on charges linked to their reporting. They served 500 days and then were released after receiving a presidential pardon.

The massacre occurred during a military crackdown in 2017 that forced nearly three-quarters of a million Rohingya to flee to neighboring Bangladesh.

rohingya massacre, myanmar
The massacre occurred during a military crackdown in 2017 that forced nearly three-quarters of a million Rohingya to flee to neighboring Bangladesh. Wikimedia Commons

United Nations investigators have said the violence warrants the prosecution of top military leaders for “genocide.” The International Criminal Court has launched a preliminary investigation into the killings.

Human Rights Watch Deputy Asia Director told the VOA Burmese Service the early release of the soldiers reveals that top Myanmar military leaders “don’t really consider the Rohingya to be human, and were never committed to seeing anyone held accountable for their crimes in Rakhine state.”

ALSO READ: Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh Face Serious Water Shortage

Asia Human Rights Commission attorney Min Lwin Oo said in an interview with VOA Burmese the soldiers’ early release “obviously shows that the military does not care about the judicial system.”

The Rohingya are widely viewed in Myanmar as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh. The military has justified its 2017 crackdown, which involved mass killings, gang rapes and widespread arson, as a way of eradicating Rohingya insurgents. (VOA)