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India’s Ambassador to US, Arun K. Singh meets top Democratic Lawmakers at DNC in Philadelphia

Indian Ambassador to the U.S., Arun Singh, meets with Democratic lawmakers at Democratic National Convention to emphasise bilateral ties

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Arun K. Singh (Right). Image source: Pintrest
  • Arun K. Singh, met up with the top Democratic lawmakers on July 26 to establish the importance of bilateral ties with India
  • Singh also met with Senator Patrick Leahy, who is also the Ranking Member of Senate Judiciary Committee and Senate Appropriation Committee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs
  • Singh addressed the event and emphasised the importance of the role the Indian-American community plays in strengthening the ties between the two countries

India’s Ambassador to the US Arun K. Singh, met the top Democratic lawmakers on July 26, to establish the importance of bilateral ties with India. The reception called “Chai and Chaat”, took place during the Republic National Convention, Philadelphia, and included lawmakers of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

The reception was organized for Singh by top Indian-American community leaders who were attending the RNC. With the elections approaching fast, the timing of the meeting may also shed light on the importance the U.S. Democrats, its lawmakers, and Clinton’s campaign was placed on strengthening the relationship with India, reported PTI.

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Singh addressed the event and emphasised the importance of the role the Indian-American community plays to reinforce the ties between the two countries. He also addressed a second event, “South Asians for Hillary”, and made similar remarks. The Ambassador also attended a diplomatic reception by the American Jewish Committee and addressed it briefly.

Singh met with important figures such as the Democratic Leader, Nancy Pelosi. He also met with Senator Patrick Leahy, who is also the Ranking Member of Senate Judiciary Committee and Senate Appropriation Committee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs.

PTI reported that the Clinton administration also highlighted the importance it would place on India-U.S. ties when the chair of Clinton’s campaign and former counsellor to current POTUS Obama, John Podesta, met with the Indian Ambassador.

Arun Singh at "Chai and Chaat" reception with House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. Image source: Indian Embassy
Arun Singh at “Chai and Chaat” reception with House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi. Image source: Indian Embassy

Singh also interacted with high-ranking Democratic lawmakers Frank Pallone, Nita Lowey and Joe Crowley, who is also the vice-chair of the Democratic Caucus and has previously co-chaired the House India Caucus.

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Ami Bera, the only Indian-American lawmaker in the U.S. House of Representatives, is also reported to have had a meeting with Singh. The reception was also attended by Senator Corry Booker, Ranking Member of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries and Coast Guards, mentioned PTI.

The Ambassador also met Vermont State Representative Kesha Ram, who is running for state lieutenant governor. 

Other attendees included notable politically inclined Indian-Americans Priya Dayananda, Shekhar Narasimhan, Anurag Verma, Sunil Puri, Mahinder Tak, Mini Timmaraju and Deepak Raj.

– prepared by Varsha Gupta of NewsGram. Twitter: @VarshaGupta94

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

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The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)