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India’s Generics Project can bring down Medicine Costs not only in the country but also Globally: WHO India head

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– by Rupesh Dutta

New Delhi, May 24, 2017: As the government gears up to push generic medicines to bring down costs for patients, World Health Organisation (WHO) representative in India Henk Bekedam has stated that the move, if successfully implemented, will not only reduce the cost of medicines within the country but also globally.

The 59-year old global health leader — who previously served in a similar capacity in Egypt — said that there were several “pre-qualified” generic medicine companies in India producing quality medicines.

“Make in India is important as India will be able to produce a greater quantity of good quality generic medicines, which will bring down the cost of medicines globally and more people in India and globally will be able to afford quality medicines,” Bekedam, who assumed his present job in November 2015, told IANS in an interview.

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Asked whether the foreign pharmaceutical companies, which are major suppliers of branded medicines, will be affected if India steps into the picture, Bekedam said that India is already the world’s pharmacy, exporting quality generic medicines and vaccines.

“And by bringing down the cost of normal medicines globally they will be accessible to every one,” he maintained.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi had said on April 17 the government will bring legislation mandating doctors to prescribe generic medicines which are cheaper than their equivalent branded drugs.

Generic medicines are the cheaper versions of branded drugs and come into the market after the patent period of the branded medicines expires. Manufacturers then replicate the medicines and come up with the cheaper versions. Since generic drugs do not involve a repeat of the extensive clinical trials to prove their safety and efficacy, it costs less to develop them.

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According to Bekedam, out-of-pocket expenditure on medicines and other treatments by patients was a burning issue that had affected India’s health system.

Stating that generic medicines can help in increasing their accessibility, Bekedam said that currently in India, two-thirds of people’s medical expenditure comes from their own pockets, which leads to hesitation among them to go for surgery and other treatment.

In such a situation, generic medicines can provide relief to the patients.

“If we compare India with other countries, the government’s contribution to health is just over one per cent of the GDP which is low by international standards. It results in people spending out of their pockets. Two-third of all health expenditure comes from people’s own pockets. It also leads to hesitation among people to seek surgeries and other treatments,” said Bekedam.

He also urged a hike in India’s health budget at a time other countries such as China, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh allocate at least three per cent of their GDP dedicated to the sector.

The Union budget allocated Rs 47,352.51 crore for health in fiscal 2017-18, against Rs 37,061.55 crore in 2016-17.

“India is a fascinating country and has similarity with other Asian countries and in terms of economic growth. When there is economic growth then there is more room for investment in health. I can see the potential in India that it can now put more money in terms of health and economic growth,” said Bekedam.

Noting that 60 million Indians are in poverty due to paying health bills, he said: “India should invest more in health.”

Having closely monitored India’s health sector for almost two years, Bekedam said such investment will help the country become less vulnerable in terms of health calamities. Investing in a surveillance system that can detect and respond to diseases is crucial.

Citing the example of three West African countries affected by Ebola, he said: “These countries lost 12 percent of their GDP. Such countries are not able to detect the disease because of which they have to suffer the loss.” (IANS)

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  • Vartika Das

    This is a great step! Keep up with the Vaccination needs MyVac is also helping Indian crowd to stay alert about vaccination.

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Cepheid to Establish Manufacturing Unit for TB Diagnostics in India

Rifampicin is a drug commonly used in treating TB bacteria in first line of treatment

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The GeneXpert Edge is developed specifically for near-patient testing, to help support a one visit test-and-treat approach.
The GeneXpert Edge is developed specifically for near-patient testing, to help support a one visit test-and-treat approach. (IANS)

Expanding its footprint in India, US-based molecular diagnostics company Cepheid Inc on Thursday announced its plans to establish a manufacturing unit in the country to improve Tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics.

Cepheid’s GeneXpert MTB/RIF test is a closed-cartridge-based system that is easy to operate by minimally trained staff and gives results in approximately two hours, speeding the conventional backlog that used to exist in traditional diagnostic methods.

The new manufacturing unit would produce MTB/RIF test cartridges, contribute to the government’s “Make in India” initiative and thus bringing the company’s global expertise in TB diagnostics to India, the company said in a statement.

As part of the plan, Cepheid also unveiled its latest portable, easy-to-use TB-testing system — the GeneXpert Edge — which is expected to be available in India later this year, the company said.

The GeneXpert Edge is developed specifically for near-patient testing, to help support a one visit test-and-treat approach.

“Cepheid recognises the need for technological advancement and is committed to contributing significantly to India’s goal of TB eradication,” said Peter Farrell, Executive Vice President, Worldwide Commercial Operations, Cepheid.

Cepheid's Xpert MTB/RIF test has the potential to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB)
Cepheid’s Xpert MTB/RIF test has the potential to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB).

“We are hopeful that GeneXpert Edge will help eliminate delays in TB diagnostics by providing definitive results within hours and facilitating fast and easy last-mile delivery even in the remote villages of India,” he added.

India has nearly one-fourth of the global TB patients and an estimated 4.8 lakh lives are lost every year due to delayed diagnosis and inadequate treatment and there are above 2.5 million new cases of TB every year. The country aims to eradicate TB by 2025.

Approved by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2010, more than 1,200 Cepheid’s GeneXpert Systems have been installed in the last two years at various Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) sites in the country and more than 2.5 million cartridges were supplied last year at various centres of Central TB Division (CTD).

Also Read: Fruit Bats Identified As Source Of Nipah Virus Outbreak in Kerala

Cepheid’s Xpert MTB/RIF test has the potential to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB) and rifampicin-resistance mutations, which are markers for MDR-TB strains in under two hours.

Rifampicin is a drug commonly used in treating TB bacteria in first line of treatment.

Xpert MTB/RIF tests also have excellent negative predictive value, which allows clinicians to manage TB-negative patients more effectively to prevent unnecessary and costly respiratory isolations. (IANS)