Sunday February 17, 2019

Indigenous schooling panacea for India’s developmental woes

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By Dr. Kallol Guha

The overall development of any nation, community or group depends not on their physical infrastructure or on the volume of foreign investment pouring into their midst, but on how their indigenous schooling has culturally conditioned their human resources to take part in a sustainable and inclusive growth of their nation and themselves.

Political parties and leaders frequently speak of vikas or ‘development’ even as they chase public offices for themselves and even their children as a lucrative career option. They vow to bring in vikas if they are elected to the chair, but smartly bypass any discussion on why this vikas eluded the nation over the past 68 years.

These politicians or their affiliated parties don’t talk about the core strategy of national development- conditioning the quality of human resource through a thoroughly indigenous schooling system, rather than imitating the foreign schooling process which would marginalize one’s own culture and make people lose all sense of self-respect.

This is exactly what went wrong in India. It is by no means impossible that such an approach towards development does in fact stretch the imagination of certain politicians who are simply not matured enough, intellectually or culturally, to grasp the human significance in the developmental process.

A more likely factor is could be that many politicians deliberately ignore the factor of human-development in national development because their loyalty is towards the Anglo-American Axis power ever since 1947.

Many politicians are simply the caretakers of the foreign interest in India.

One must realize, it was the transfer of power from the colonial masters to their brokers which is termed as ‘independence’. This ‘independence’ is different from gaining freedom through mass struggle which is what Subhas Chandra Bose, Bhagat Singh, Chandrasekhar Azad tried to do.

It is amusing to conjecture what happens to the inner fabric of a nation where the history of independence is systematically falsified.

Heroes of freedom struggle are branded as terrorists or are phased out with silence. Martyrs are ignored and marginalized. The brokers of power-transfer from foreign occupation to their agents (the Mir Zafars of today) control national administration.

Corruption, underdevelopment, degradation of human resources and cultural erosion, have for all practical purposes made India an appendage of the West or a client state of the Anglo-American axis. The situation in India now is the most natural outcome of a system based on lies and deception.

As long as India is wrapped up in the Anglo-American Axis tentacles and resources worth trillions are transferred to them (as was revealed during India Against Corruption Movement), local and international marketing forces of the Axis Power will continue to propagate India as the “largest Democracy” and brand it with “Freedom of Press”.

There is no sign of a truly effective government designed after the ideas of Azad Hind Fauz, emerging in the political scenario of India. If it does, the Axis power and their Indian clients– the Anglophonic press and a large section of the Anglophonic Indians– would be one of the first to oppose them.

India has had a long tradition of being ruled by minority foreign powers. After the Afghans, Persians, Turks and British, it is now the turn of the Anglophonic Indians to rule modern India. In this context, the 90 percent of Indians who are not Anglophonic have no chance of leading a dignified life through the development of their own language, culture, and heritage.

They can, at best, expect to survive on the left-overs of the Anglophonic ruling class, who in turn thrive on the legacy of their Anglo-American masters and call it ‘development’.

Next Story

Human Rights Situation in North Korea Needs Reforms

In all areas related to the enjoyment of economic and social rights, including health, housing, education, social security, employment, food, water and sanitation, much of the country’s population is being left behind

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United Nations special rapporteur on the rights situation in North Korea Tomas Ojea Quintana attends a press conference following his report on the country to the Human Rights Council, March 12, 2018 in Geneva. A year later, little has changed. (VOA)

Despite more than a year of international engagement and promises of economic reform by North Korea’s leaders, the human rights situation in the isolated country remains dire, a top U.N. rights official said Friday.

Blocked by the government from visiting North Korea, U.N. special rapporteur for human rights in North Korea Tomas Quintana visited South Korea this week as part of an investigation that will be provided to the U.N. Human Rights Council in March.

North Korea
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un visits a factory in this undated photo released by North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency, Aug. 7, 2018. (VOA)

Noting that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has embarked on an effort to improve living conditions by focusing on economic development, Quintana said his preliminary findings showed those efforts had not translated into improvements in the lives of most people.

“The fact is, that with all the positive developments the world has witnessed in the last year, it is all the more regrettable that the reality for human rights on the ground remains unchanged, and continues to be extremely serious,” he told reporters at a briefing in Seoul.

“In all areas related to the enjoyment of economic and social rights, including health, housing, education, social security, employment, food, water and sanitation, much of the country’s population is being left behind,” Quintana added.

North Korea, Humaqn Rights
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in inside the Peace House at the border village of Panmunjom in Demilitarized Zone, South Korea, April 27, 2018.

Left out of talks

North Korea denies human rights abuses and says the issue is used by the international community as a political ploy to isolate it.

Human rights were noticeably absent from talks between Kim and the leaders of South Korea and the United States last year, over North Korea’s nuclear weapons program.

But in December, the United States imposed sanctions on an additional three North Korean officials, including a top aide to Kim, for serious rights abuses and censorship.

North Korea’s foreign ministry warned in a statement after the December sanctions were announced, that the measures could lead to a return to “exchanges of fire” and North Korea’s disarming could be blocked forever.

Kim acknowledgement

While noting he had “no specific information” on whether international sanctions were hurting ordinary North Koreans, Quintana said the sanctions targeted the economy as a whole and “raised questions” about the possible impact on the public.

He cited a reference by Kim in his new year message to the need to improve living standards, saying it was a rare acknowledgement of the economic and social hardships faced by many North Koreans.

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Still, the United Nations has confirmed the continued use of political prison camps housing “thousands” of inmates, Quintana said, quoting one source as saying “the whole country is a prison.”

He said witnesses who recently left North Korea reported facing widespread discrimination, labor exploitation and corruption in daily life.

There is also a “continuing pattern of ill-treatment and torture” of defectors who escaped to China only to be returned to North Korea by Chinese authorities, Quintana said. (VOA)