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Indira Gandhi International Airport bags the award for World’s Best Airport

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India tops domestic air passenger traffic in September, China second: IATA

The IGI airport's Terminal 3 - T3, an integrated terminal for International and Domestic which can handle 34 million passengers annually ahead of the Commonwealth Games

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport (IGIA) was adjudged the world’s best airport for the year 2014. Airports Council International (ACI) presented the Airport Service Quality (ASQ) award to IGIA at a ceremony held on April 28 in Jordan.

As per the officials, the IGIA ranked first under the category of airports handling 25 to 40 million passengers per annum.

“We are honoured to represent an Indian airport at a highly acclaimed international forum as ACI. Our IGI Airport partners and employees have consistently delivered a memorable and distinct experience to our customers, enabling us to achieve the coveted world number one position,” said I. Prabhakara Rao, CEO of Delhi International Airport Pvt. Limited, which manages IGIA.

The Delhi airport scored 4.90 on a scale of 5 points measured by 300 members of the ACI under Airport Service Quality (ASQ) benchmark programme. IGI improved its ranking from second position for 2011, 2012 and 2013 to come out as a clear winner in 2014.

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Hospital in Jordan Gives War Victims New Hope, Develops 3D-printed Prosthetics for War Victims

Ayed said his prosthetic is life-changing. Though difficult to use at first, therapy helped him regain skills such as tying his shoes or putting on a shirt.

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An employee shows a 3D-printed prosthetic hand, created at the FabLab in city of Irbid, Jordan, Feb. 26, 2019. VOA

A hospital in Jordan has given a victim of Yemen’s war new hope for the future, thanks to the cutting edge technology of 3D printed prosthetics.

Abdullah Ayed, 21, lost one arm and badly damaged the other when his home in Aden was hit by an explosive in 2017.

He spent weeks in a coma in a local hospital. When he woke, he learned one of his arms had to be amputated while the other was almost beyond repair.

“I wished for death, that would have been better than being like this,” said Ayed. “It was embarrassing to go out with my hand amputated, especially still being young, I wanted to get married, I wanted a job. But I did not lose my faith in God.”

In August 2018, the international medical charity, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), sent Ayed to Amman for treatment and rehabilitation.

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“I had lost hope in life, but now after training my mental state is much better,” he said. VOA

The MSF reconstructive surgery program was set up in 2006, and aims to help patients regain independence. Ayed was chosen to receive a 3D-printed prosthetic.

Project supervisor, Samar Ismail, said 3D-printed prosthetics are faster to produce and much cheaper. The price for a 3D limb is around 30$, while the more conventional limbs start at 200$ and can go up to thousands of dollars.

The lightweight is also a huge advantage, Ismail added, which enables patients to use them for longer.

So far, more than 20 limbs have been fitted to patients, from Gaza, Iraq, Syria and Yemen.

War-wounded Abdullah Ayed, 21 year-old man from Yemen, tries his 3D-printed prosthetic limb at the MSF-run hospital in Amman, Jordan, Feb. 27, 2019.
War-wounded Abdullah Ayed, 21 year-old man from Yemen, tries his 3D-printed prosthetic limb at the MSF-run hospital in Amman, Jordan, Feb. 27, 2019. VOA

Ayed said his prosthetic is life-changing. Though difficult to use at first, therapy helped him regain skills such as tying his shoes or putting on a shirt.

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“I had lost hope in life, but now after training my mental state is much better,” he said.

He is practicing motor-skills that would enable him to work at a laundromat. But his biggest dream is to be able to go back to Yemen, get married and start a family.

“That’s all I want, to go back home and for things to get better there.” (VOA)