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Indo-Canadian to hold exhibition on Sikhs with unshorn hair

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Toronto: With an aim to showcase a connection between spirituality and unshorn hair in Sikhism, an Indo-Canadian photographer will put on display from October 29 a series of photographs of three Sikh men with long, flowing hair, a media report said.

A photographer from Abbotsford city in Canada, Suvi Bains will exhibit six life-sized portraits of the three Sikh men who posed in their bedrooms with long, unshorn hair, The Province reported on Tuesday.

Unshorn hair are one of the five articles of faith in Sikhism.

The photographs by Bains under ‘Kesh’ project will be displayed at The Reach Gallery Museum in Abbotsford from October 29 to January 3.

Bains said she had never seen a Sikh man – other than her balding grandfather – remove his turban but when she saw a friend loosen his long hair from his turban she decided to explore the Sikh culture in this aspect.

“(It was) so stark and beautiful… stark, gorgeous long hair. I was very touched and wanted to explore,” Bains said.

“Kesh (hair) pushes the boundaries of what is socially acceptable in the Sikh culture,” Bains said.

Bains said her intention was to showcase a “very unique side of our culture”. She said she wanted to promote understanding, spark dialogue, address the “what’s under there” question about the turban, as well as challenge cultural stereotypes.

Although the project is now complete, she said, she faced many obstacles.

She said she began the project with 15 Sikhs but 12 quit because they were not comfortable.

“In our culture, you do not just go in someone else’s room and take these kind of personal photographs. I am a woman coming into their house, in their private rooms and taking these images,” said Bains.

(IANS)

 

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)