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Infosys – ATP tie-up calls for enhanced tennis experience

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animation2By Newsgram Staff Writer

Tennis fans and players can brace themselves for an enhanced and transformative experience as Infosys, the global leader in consulting, technology, outsourcing and next-generation services, and ATP, the governing body of men’s professional tennis have announced a strategic partnership to leverage the latest technological advances in mobility, cloud and analytics.

According to a media release, as part of this partnership, Infosys will become the Global Technology Services Partner and Platinum Sponsor of the ATP World Tour, as well as the season-ending Barclays ATP World Tour Finals, for the next three years.

The development opens the door for Infosys to leverage its expertise in cloud, mobility and analytics to manage, analyze and interpret large volumes of tennis data (both historical and current) to present insights and predictions through interactive platforms for ATP fans, players, partners and the media.

Under the partnership, several key initiatives will be worked upon by Infosys for the ATP World Tour. These include creation of an exclusive Infosys ATP Scores and Stats Center to revolutionise engagement with tennis fans through every tournament, match and point.

The Scores and Stats Center will be powered by the Infosys Information Platform (IIP), an open-source data analytics platform for data visualization and data analysis.

The partnership also envisages an ATP Player Zone; a next-generation player engagement platform and mobile app to elevate the experience for players by enabling them to register for tournaments, review travel information, connect with other players, and stay up-to-date on all ATP World Tour news.

“As personally a fan of tennis, it is really exciting to think about how we can invent great new and engaging experiences for fans.

Great experience for tennis fans is what ATP has always stood for, and we can now take this to even greater heights with our work together,” Vishal Sikka, Chief Executive Officer, Infosys, said.

“Fans will soon have the opportunity to get completely immersed in the action, and feel the passion and intensity in every match, and more.

This partnership will enable us to bring new experiences in new ways to fans worldwide and will also serve to inform many new types of consumer engagements in other walks of life,” Sikka further remarked.

On the other front, Chris Kermode, ATP executive chairman and president, said, “We are delighted to be launching this new partnership with Infosys. The opportunities surrounding technology, statistics and data in men’s professional tennis are vast.

“Today’s announcement is fantastic news for the ATP as we welcome an industry leader in Infosys and take an important step towards exploring new opportunities in this area”.

(With inputs from IANS)

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Robots May Be Able to Perform C-Sections Soon

These big, set-piece operations will become less common as we are able to intervene earlier and use more moderate interventions

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C-section, Robots
A newborn, one of 12 babies born by C-section, cries inside an incubator at the Bunda Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Dec. 12, 2012. VOA

Robotics are expected to become so sophisticated, hospitals may not need surgeons. Controlled by healthcare assistants, the machines will soon be delivering babies by carrying out C-sections as well as other surgeries, say experts.

The predictions are based on the report by the “Commission on the Future of Surgery” set up by the Royal College of Surgeons in 2017, the Daily Mail reported.

According to the report, the robots controlled by healthcare assistants such as technicians are expected to conduct vaginal surgeries and operations on the bowel, heart and lungs.

This will help advance diagnoses of illnesses like cancer before they destroy organs and, as a result, operations will be smaller in scale and less traumatic.

Robot, Reading Companion
FILE – A visitor shakes hands with a humanoid robot at 2018 China International Robot Show in Shanghai (VOA)

Even healthcare assistants — who do not need any formal qualifications to get a job — could one day be trained to perform C-sections with the robots, The Telegraph reported.

Specialists and surgeons will remain in charge of operations but may not always need to be in the room.

“This is always going to be under the watchful eye and careful supervision of a surgeon,” Richard Kerr, neurosurgeon at the Oxford University and Chair of the commission, was quoted as saying.

“These are highly qualified healthcare professionals and they will be trained in a specific aspect of that procedure.

“The changes are expected to affect every type of operation. This will be a watershed moment in surgery,” Kerr said.

While some applications of robots and DNA-based medicines are expected to happen sooner than others, those with healthcare assistant-led C-sections is possible within five years, the report said.

C-section, Robots
These are highly qualified healthcare professionals and they will be trained in a specific aspect of that procedure. Flickr

However, the experts warn that the use of robots in surgery could be controversial. This is in light of an investigation which revealed that a 69-year-old man in Newcastle died when a robot was used to carry out his heart surgery in 2015.

The commission’s report also claims that major cancer operations could become a thing of past because screening DNA will pick up diseases earlier, before they ravage the body.

Also Read: AI  to Help the Students of Japan in Enhancing English Speaking Skills

Similarly, people with severe forms of arthritis could be identified early on and faster treatment might reduce the need for major hip and knee replacement ops.

“These big, set-piece operations will become less common as we are able to intervene earlier and use more moderate interventions,” said Professor Dion Mortonm, a member of the commission. (IANS)