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Instagram Releases Tools to Combat Bullying

A few months ago, the company introduced a bullying comment filter to proactively detect and hide bullying comments from Feed, Explore and Profile.

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Kevin Systrom, CEO and co-founder of Instagram, prepares for Wednesday's announcement about IGTV in San Francisco, June 19, 2018. (VOA)

Facebook-owned photo sharing platform Instagram on Tuesday announced their latest tools to help combat bullying, including a new way to identify and report bullying in photos.

The company is using Machine Learning (ML) technology to proactively detect bullying in photos and their captions.

“This change will help us identify and remove significantly more bullying — and it’s a crucial next step since many people who experience or observe bullying don’t report it,” Adam Mosseri, Head of Instagram, said in a blogpost.

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Kevin Systrom, CEO and co-founder of Instagram, prepares for an announcement about IGTV in San Francisco. VOA

“It will also help us protect our youngest community members since teens experience higher rates of bullying online than others,” Mosseri added.

Recently, Mosseri replaced Instagram co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger as the new head who abruptly announced their departure in September.

The new technology has begun to roll out and will continue to in the coming weeks.

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The company is using Machine Learning (ML) technology Pixabay

A few months ago, the company introduced a bullying comment filter to proactively detect and hide bullying comments from Feed, Explore and Profile.

Also Read: Facebook Brings AI-Powered Video Chat Speakers

“We are now adding this filter to comments on live videos to ensure that “Live” remains a safe and fun place to authentically connect with your friends and interests. This is now globally available for all live videos,” Mosseri said. (IANS)

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Facebook Reveals Millions of Instagram Passwords Stored on Servers

Facebook had found that some user passwords were being stored in a readable format within our internal data storage systems.

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The company on Thursday revealed that millions of passwords belonging to the users of its photo-sharing service Instagram were also exposed. Pixabay

A day after admitting it “unintentionally” uploaded emails of nearly 1.5 million of new users, Facebook has now revealed that millions of Instagram passwords were stored on its servers in a readable format.

Last month, Facebook said that it fixed a security issue wherein millions of its users’ passwords were stored in plain text and “readable” format for years and were searchable by thousands of its employees.

The company on Thursday revealed that millions of passwords belonging to the users of its photo-sharing service Instagram were also exposed.

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The revelation came to light after a security researcher noticed that “Facebook was asking some users to enter their email passwords when they signed up for new accounts to verify their identities”. VOA

“We discovered additional logs of Instagram passwords being stored in a readable format. We now estimate that this issue impacted millions of Instagram users,” said the social networking giant in an update.

“We will be notifying these users as we did the others. Our investigation has determined that these stored passwords were not internally abused or improperly accessed.”

Facebook had found that some user passwords were being stored in a readable format within our internal data storage systems.

“This caught our attention because our login systems are designed to mask passwords using techniques that make them unreadable. We have fixed these issues and as a precaution will be notifying everyone whose passwords we found stored this way,” wrote Pedro Canahuati, Vice President, Engineering, Security and Privacy at Facebook.

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“We discovered additional logs of Instagram passwords being stored in a readable format. We now estimate that this issue impacted millions of Instagram users,” said the social networking giant in an update. Pixabay

A Facebook spokesperson admitted late Wednesday that emails of 1.5 million people were harvested since May 2016 to help build Facebook’s web of social connections and recommend other users to add as friends.

The revelation came to light after a security researcher noticed that “Facebook was asking some users to enter their email passwords when they signed up for new accounts to verify their identities”.

Also Read: The Errant Son: Mir Murtaza And Al-Zulfiqar
The social network said the contacts weren’t shared with anyone and were being deleted.

In March, a report by Krebs On Security claimed that around 200-600 million Facebook users may have had their account passwords stored in plain text and searchable by over 20,000 Facebook employees. (IANS)