Monday December 16, 2019

Interesting Study! Something That Reminds Us Of Coffee Can Alert Our Minds

However, the study noted that the association between coffee and arousal is not as strong in less coffee-dominated cultures.

0
//
coffee
"People often encounter coffee-related cues, or think about coffee without actually ingesting it," Maglio said. Pixabay

Finding it hard to concentrate? Just looking at something that reminds us of coffee can cause our minds to become more alert and attentive, according to a new study.

“Coffee is one of the most popular beverages and a lot is known about its physical effects,” said Sam Maglio, Associate Professor at the University of Toronto in Canada.

However, much less is known about its psychological meaning — in other words, how even seeing reminders of it can influence how we think, Maglio added.

coffee
“Coffee is one of the most popular beverages and a lot is known about its physical effects,” said Sam Maglio, Associate Professor at the University of Toronto in Canada. Pixabay

The study, published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition, looks at an effect called priming, through which exposure to even subtle cues can influence our thoughts and behaviour.

“People often encounter coffee-related cues, or think about coffee without actually ingesting it,” Maglio said.

The team used a mix of participants from Western and Eastern cultures “to see if there was an association between coffee and arousal such that if we simply exposed people to coffee-related cues, their physiological arousal would increase, as it would if they had actually drank coffee,” he noted.

coffee
The study, published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition, looks at an effect called priming, through which exposure to even subtle cues can influence our thoughts and behaviour. Pixabay

They found that participants exposed to coffee-related cues perceived time as shorter and thought in more concrete, precise terms.

“People who experience physiological arousal — again, in this case as the result of priming and not drinking coffee itself — see the world in more specific, detailed terms,” Maglio said. “This has a number of implications for how people process information and make judgements and decisions.”

Also Read: In Effort To Reduce Unplanned Pregnancies And Abortions, Some Conservative States Easing Access to Birth Control

However, the study noted that the association between coffee and arousal is not as strong in less coffee-dominated cultures.

Maglio said the research may be of interest in better understanding a range of consumer-related behaviours and for marketers in considering retail store locations. (IANS)

Next Story

Consumption of Coffee May Reduce MetS: Study

Drinking coffee may reduce heart disease risk

0
Coffee-reduce MetS
Coffee has been proven to reduce MetS. Pixabay

Coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Mets), say researchers adding that MetS increases the risk of cardiovascular problems, including coronary heart disease and stroke.

According the study, Assistant Professor Giuseppe Grosso from the University of Catania, Italy, reviewed his own scientific research on the association between coffee consumption and MetS in Polish and Italian cohorts and explored the potential mechanistic perspectives behind the inverse association.

His research suggests that polyphenols contained in coffee may be involved in the inverse association, specifically phenolic acids and flavonoids.

He also reviewed research that suggests that moderate coffee consumption is associated with a reduction of CVD, cancer, all-cause mortality and type 2 diabetes.

For the findings, Associate Professor Estefania from Toledo University of Navarra, Spain, reviewed meta-analyses considering associations between coffee consumption and MetS and discussed work in a Mediterranean cohort.

Her research involved 22,000 people and specifically considered caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.

Reducing MetS- coffee
Average consumption of coffee can reduce the risk of heart diseases by reducing MetS. Pixabay

The study concluded that moderate coffee consumption (one to four cups per day) was associated with reduced risk of MetS, whilst higher intakes were not.

This was reported for both regular and decaffeinated coffee.

The inverse association between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome was shown in both men and women, said the study.

Also Read- Women Affected The Most By Environmental Stress: Study

Meta-analyses also found that a moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may be associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome.

The study was presented at the 13th European Nutrition Conference organised by the Federation of European Nutrition Societies (FENS) in Dublin, Ireland. (IANS)