Monday January 21, 2019
Home Uncategorized Iran deal is ...

Iran deal is victory over war: Iranian President

0
//
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. Photo Credit: observer.com

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

United Nations: Iranian President Hassan Rouhani told the United Nations General Assembly on Monday that the Iran deal is a victory over war.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. Photo Credit: http://www.telegraph.co.uk
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. Photo Credit: http://www.telegraph.co.uk

“The nuclear deal — (is a) victory over war,” Xinhua news agency quoted Rouhani as saying.

“(It) has managed to disperse the clouds of hostility and perhaps even the specter of another war and extensive tensions from the Middle East,” he said.

The statement came as the Iranian president was speaking at the General Debate of the UN General Assembly, which opened here on Monday morning.

In July, Iran and six world major countries adopted an agreement on the Iranian nuclear issue that will put Iran on the path of sanctions relief but more strict limits on its nuclear program. The nuclear deal reached with the six world major countries is expected to help build confidence.

The comprehensive agreement was clinched between Iran and the P5+1 group — Britain, China, France, Russia, and the United States plus Germany — after more than two weeks of tough bargaining in Vienna, the capital city of Austria.

Under the deal, the Security Council is expected to lift sanctions against Iran in return for Iran meeting strict conditions regarding its nuclear program.

Rouhani said that Iran would continue to seek peace within the region, adding that he had been elected two-years ago with a “mandate for consolidating peace and constructive engagement with the world”. He said that the deal also represented an opportunity for economic growth and development.

(With inputs from IANS)

Next Story

Assam’s Citizen Register Raises Concern of U.N. Human Rights Expert

Assam, a state of 33 million people known for its lush tea estates, has for decades been racked by violence between indigenous tribes and settlers.

0
Assam
A woman, whose name is left out in the National Register of Citizens (NRC) draft, stands in a a line to collect forms to file appeals at a NRC Sewa Kendra (NSK) in Guwahati, Aug. 11, 2018. VOA

Three United Nations human rights experts expressed “deep concern” Thursday over a controversial citizens register in India’s Assam state, warning it could inflame ethnic tensions in an already fractious region.

A new draft Register of Citizens (NRC) in the northeastern state announced in July left off four million people, leaving them potentially stateless and facing an uncertain future.

Critics say it is the latest move by the right-wing party of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to bolster India’s Hindu majority at the expense of minorities. India will hold a national election next year.

assam
Bakrapara, Assam

The policy was introduced by the state government, which is controlled by the same BJP party in power nationally.

“We are… seriously concerned about the lack of clarity regarding what will happen to those left out of the finalized NRC,” said a joint statement from the UN special rapporteur on religious freedoms, Ahmed Shaheed, the rapporteur for minority rights, Fernand de Varennes and an expert on arbitrary detentions, Seong-Phil Hong.

“There is a risk that persons not part of the NRC could become stateless, be at risk of deportation, or be subject to large-scale migration detention,” they said.

The deadline to provide the necessary documents to be included on the register has been set for December 31.

Assam
Indian Muslim men shout slogans during a protest against tensions in India’s northeastern state of Assam, in New Delhi, India, Aug. 8, 2012.
Source:VOA

The current register includes only those who were able to prove they were in the state before 1971, when millions fled Bangladesh’s war of independence into the state, and their descendants.

Also Read: Firefighters of India Battle Air Pollution In The Country’s Capital

Assam, a state of 33 million people known for its lush tea estates, has for decades been racked by violence between indigenous tribes and settlers.

“It is feared that this entire process is increasing inter-ethnic tensions in a region that has already experienced a tumultuous history of identity-based conflicts,” de Varennes said. (VOA)