Saturday August 18, 2018

Irregular Periods Strongly Linked To Type 2 Diabetes In Girls

Irregular periods linked to Type-2 diabetes in girls: Study

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Irregular periods linked to Type-2 diabetes in girls: Study
Irregular periods linked to Type-2 diabetes in girls Pixabay
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Girls diagnosed with Type-2 diabetes have a high frequency of menstrual irregularities — a symptom of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), finds a study.?

PCOS — a hormonal disorder that enlarges ovaries with small cysts on the outer edges — causes insulin resistance, the hallmark of Type-2 diabetes.

“It’s important for girls with Type-2 diabetes to be assessed for menstrual problems,” said lead author Megan Kelsey, from the University of Colorado in Aurora, US.

“Infrequent periods can be associated with heavy and painful periods, increased risk for fatty liver disease, fertility problems and long-term increased risk for endometrial cancer,” Kelsey added.

For the study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, the team evaluated the frequency of menstrual irregularity in girls with recently diagnosed diabetes and whether the addition of intensive lifestyle or rosiglitazone to previous treatment with metformin helped to improve symptoms.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

These treatments are often used to treat both diabetes and PCOS.

The researchers found that more than 20 per cent of girls had irregular periods. Many of those girls also had high testosterone levels, pointing to PCOS as an underlying cause.

Also Read: Indian Entrepreneurs Build Mobile Apps To Help Patients With Diabetes

However, not all the girls with irregular periods had elevated testosterone, suggesting other causes for menstrual dysfunction, including pregnancy, hormonal imbalances, infections, diseases, trauma and certain medications.

“Our findings suggest that girls with youth-onset diabetes may need the additional intervention above and beyond their diabetes treatment to improve their menstrual health,” Kelsey said.  IANS

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Here’s How Mushrooms can Help in the Treatment of Diabetes

Managing glucose better has implications for diabetes, as well as other metabolic diseases

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Mushrooms
How mushrooms can aid in diabetes treatment, Find out here. Pixabay

Eating white button mushrooms daily can act as a prebiotic by improving microbial community in the gut, which could then improve the regulation of glucose in the liver, a finding that could one day pave way for new diabetes treatments, say researchers.

In the study, feeding white button mushrooms to mice changed the composition of gut microbes — microbiota — to produce more short chain fatty acids, specifically propionate from succinate, according to Margherita T. Cantorna, Professor at Pennsylvania State University in the US.

Previous research has shown that succinate and propionate can change the expression of genes needed to manage glucose production, she said.

“Managing glucose better has implications for diabetes, as well as other metabolic diseases,” Cantorna noted.

The study, reported in the Journal of Functional Foods, used two types of mice who were fed about a daily serving size of the mushrooms. One group had microbiota, the other were germ-free.

Mushrooms
Mushrooms. Pixabay

Consuming the mushrooms set off a chain reaction among the gut bacteria, expanding the population of Prevotella — a bacteria that produces propionate and succinate.

These acids can change the expression of genes that are key to the pathway between the brain and the gut that helps manage the production of glucose, or gluconeogenesis.

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The mushrooms, in this case, serve as a prebiotic, which is a substance that feeds beneficial bacteria that are already existing in the gut. Probiotics are live beneficial bacteria that are introduced into the digestive system.

Beyond the possible beneficial benefits of mushrooms as a prebiotic, Cantorna said that this study also shows more evidence that there is a tight connection between diet and microbiota.

“It’s pretty clear that almost any change you make to the diet, changes the microbiota,” Cantorna added. (IANS)