Thursday December 13, 2018

Is it right for Sikhs to oppose the inclusion of Golden Temple in World Heritage Site list?

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Fearing external intervention in the religious affairs of Sikhs, the community worldwide is vehemently opposing the inclusion of Sri Harmandir Sahib, also known as the Golden Temple, in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

The 39th session of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee will be held in Bonn, Germany in June 2015 to decide the new add-ons in the list of the World Heritage Sites. With 32 such sites already in the list, India’s proposal for 47 more sites (including the Golden Temple) will be considered by the committee this year.

However, the issue has irked some segments of Sikh community.

A petition, submitted on Change.org by a Sikh student in Belgium asking UNESCO to score through Harmandir Sahib from the tentative list, has fetched almost 15,000 signatures. The petition reasons:

To declare Harmandir Sahib as a heritage site is highly shocking to the entire Sikh community. This place belongs to the Sikh community and it is not the right of anyone to take it over. The present generation Sikh community is looking after Sri Harmandir Sahib very well and it stands as the most important place of Sikhs and Sikhism.

The Sikh community does not endorse the consideration of Sri Harmandir Sahib as a Heritage site by the Indian Government to UNESCO / UN.  This move has not been done by involving the Sikh community but has been silently done without sharing information about it to the Sikh community. In fact, it stands as a complete deceit to the entire Sikh community by offering away the rights of our holiest shrine.

The opponents also include the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee (SGPC), which administers the Golden Temple. Organizations such as Dal Khalsa in UK and sikh24.com assert that the site’s inclusion in World Heritage Sites is Indian government’s gambit to gain control over the holiest Sikh shrine. Undoubtedly, the resistance is entrenched in the fear that designating the Golden Temple as a World Heritage equals to an inexorable loss of control.

Is the outcry justified?

In fact, this fear stands on an illogical ground. There is never a claim of possession or supervision made by UNESCO on any World Heritage Site. Most importantly, being tagged as a World Heritage Site is a symbolic tribute for the site’s exceptional contribution to humanity, culture and heritage. The honor is combined with UNESCO’s eternal commitment to preserve site’s indispensable features.

The SGPC says that it needs no external aide in maintaining the complex – something that is justified to an extent. However, Harmandir Sahab’s inclusion in World Heritage Site may prompt enhancements around the complex. It will, at the same time, check any kind of new developments there that can harm the structure.

In fact, former general secretary of SGPC, Kiranjot Kaur, had told a newspaper that the entire social media misinformation campaign against the inclusion of Golden Temple in the list is utterly baseless.

UNESCO quotes, “World Heritage Sites belong to all the people of the world, irrespective of the territory on which they are located,” – few lines, which are enough to challenge the presumption of sites like sikh24.com and petition by Sikh student on Change.org.

No doubt, the continuous opposition from the Sikh community worldwide can force World Heritage Community to strike off the name of Harmandir Sahib, but imagine what a pity it would be for the citizens of India.

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Copyright 2015 NewsGram

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Concerned Over The Rise of Drug Usage In The State: Himachal Governor

A three-day horse trade-cum-exhibition was organised before the beginning of the Lavi Fair.

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There are countless mothers who have been constantly tormented by drug-dependent adolescent children. Pixabay

Himachal Pradesh Governor Acharya Devvrat on Sunday expressed concern over the rise in drug addiction, particularly among the youth in the state, and called for concerted efforts to tackle the menace.

“Effective steps have been taken by the government and police administration, but we all need to work together in this direction,” he said at the inauguration of the centuries-old Lavi Fair in Rampur town, which was once a centre of barter trade with Tibet.

He called upon the people to promote natural farming. The state government has made a provision of Rs 25 crore to promote natural or organic farming to produce chemical-free food.

The 400-year-old Lavi Fair has undergone a sea change with the rural folk’s changing lifestyles and aspirations, resulting in a greater sale of gadgets and automobiles than traditional items such as farm implements, livestock and dry fruits.

Himachal
‘The traders from across the border have stopped coming’ Pixabay

The fair dates back to the time when Raja Kehari Singh of Rampur Bushahr state signed a treaty to promote trade with Tibet.

Rampur, 120 kilometres from state capital Shimla, was once a major trade centre as it is located on the old silk route connecting Afghanistan, Tibet and Ladakh in Jammu and Kashmir.

“People have stopped buying farm implements, horses and sheep. Now, they prefer to shop luxury goods like television sets and automobiles,” trader Ishwar Goyal told IANS.

Chief Minister Jai Ram Thakur will preside over the concluding session of the fair on November 14.

Another trader Deepak Negi said Rampur was a centre of trade before the 1962 India-China war.

The traders from Tibet used to bring raw wool, butter, herbs and leather products and bartered them for wheat, rice, farm implements and livestock.

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Rampur, 120 kilometres from state capital Shimla, was once a major trade centre as it is located on the old silk route connecting Afghanistan. Pixabay

“Now, the traders from across the border have stopped coming. Indian multinational companies come here to sell their products. The fair has largely lost its relevance,” he added.

A three-day horse trade-cum-exhibition was organised before the beginning of the Lavi Fair. The main attraction during the exhibition were the Chamurthi horses – an endangered species known as the ‘Ship Of the Cold Desert’. Being a surefooted animal, it is mainly used for transporting goods in the Himalayas.

Also Read: Quitting Junk Food May Cause You to Suffer Withdrawal Symptoms Similar to Drug Addition

The Chamurthi horse traces its origin to the Tibet region. In India, it’s bred in the villages of Himachal Pradesh bordering China.

The fair sees several folk artistes from Punjab and Himachal Pradesh perform. (IANS)