Sunday January 26, 2020

Is October a month of celebrating Weird and Exquisite Festivals? Here is a List!

Festivals help us get rid of our monotonous life once in a while and create cultural harmony

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Fireworks near the clock tower, Canada. (Wikimedia Commons)

October 8, 2016: Festivals play an integral role in relieving ourselves from the monotony of life. They create an environment of cultural harmony. All these festivals are exquisite as well as weird. Few of them celebrated in the month of October are-
i. Nagasaki Kunchi
It is one of the most popular festivals of Japan. Dragon Dance is the most popular tradition of this festival. Each district participates once a year. The festival ends when the empty mikoshi returns to the shrine after the god has departed.

ii. Naga Fireball festival
This festival is all about the mysterious appearance of fireballs above Mekong River in Thailand. Tradition says that fireballs come from the breath of Naga, a mythical serpent that haunts the river. Though, some people believe that fireballs are actually bubbles of methane from the river.

iii. Oktoberfest
It is the largest Volksfest across the world celebrated annually at Munich, Bavaria, Germany. The festival was first celebrated as a royal event. Now, every year approximately 6,000,000 litres of beer is consumed along with some pork sausages, roast chicken and roast ox. Apart from all the eating and drinking, there are parades, traditional music and German amusements, folk costumes,etc.

iv. Tübingen Duck Race
Every year, people of Tübingen, Germany participate in the annual duck race. Anyone with a rubber duck can participate. All you have to do is stick your name and number on the duck, attach a metal to the underside and release the duck. Winner gets a €1,000 holiday voucher. So if you want to see thousands of rubber ducks floating downstream, Tübingen is the place for you.

v. Vijayadashmi
Vijayadashmi or Dussehra is celebrated on the tenth day of the Hindu autumn lunar month of Ashvin. The first nine days are celebrated as Maha Navratri. Dussehra signifies the slaying of Ravana by Lord Rama.

vi. Phuket Vegetarian Festival
Also known as Nine Emperor Gods festival, it is a nine-day Taoist celebration, observed in the South-east Asian countries. It is believed that once, a Chinese opera group got sick while performing on the island. They started praying to the Nine Emperor Gods to cleanse their body and spirit and restricted to the vegetarian diet. Soon the group made a complete recovery. This festival is not for the faint heart. The celebration consists of self-mortification acts including puncturing of cheeks.

vii. Diwali
Diwali is one of the most auspicious festivals of the Hindus. People light small lamps with oil to celebrate the victory of good over evil. It celebrates the homecoming of Lord Rama after he defeated Ravana, King of Lanka, and rescued his wife, Devi Sita.

viii. Halloween
Halloween is celebrated an evening before All Hallow’s day, on 31st October. The festival is thought to be originated from the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, when people would wear costumes to wander off roaming ghosts. Today this festival has transformed into a child-friendly celebration with trick or treat.

by Diksha Arya of Newsgram. Twitter: @dikshaarya_53

  • Antara

    October is indeed a month of grand festivals!

Next Story

No White Christmas in Shimla This Year Too!

They concluded that Shimla's harsh winter, which normally commenced in November and ended in March, has declined after the mid-1980s

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What's better than travelling to Shimla this summer
What's better than travelling to Shimla this festive season? Pixabay

There will be no “white” Christmas in Shimla and elsewhere in Himachal Pradesh this time too. A mellow sunshine will greet you throughout the day at most of the tourist destinations with the weather bureau on Tuesday predicting open skies in the state.

“There is no significant Western Disturbances active in the region. Most of the towns in the state will witness sunny days till December 28,” Manmohan Singh, Director of Shimla’s Met office, told IANS.

He said there are chances of rain and snow in the state on or after December 31 with active western disturbances.

Temperatures have been unusually low in most of the popular tourist spots like Shimla, Kufri, Narkanda, Kasauli, Chail, Manali, Dalhousie, Dharamsala, Palampur and Chamba.

Keylong, the headquarters of Lahaul and Spiti district, was the coldest place with the minimum temperature dipping to minus 12.4 degrees Celsius.

The night temperature in capital Shimla was 2.2 degrees Celsius, whereas Kalpa, some 250 km from here, saw a low of minus 4.4 degrees Celsius.

It was minus 2.8 degrees Celsius in Manali, 2.2 degrees in Dharamsala and 2.7 degrees in Dalhousie.

However, foggy conditions would continue in low hills, mainly in Una, Bilaspur, Hamirpur and Kangra districts.

Una town, adjoining Punjab, saw a low of 6.4 degrees Celsius, 11 notches below normal owing to dense fog.

But excited holidaymakers, mainly from the northern plains, have already started descending on tourist resorts across the state with a hope of white Christmas.

Christmas
Christmas is celebrated every year to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ. Pixabay

Shimla, which had season’s first snowfall this time on December 13, last recorded snowfall on Christmas in 2017 after a gap of over two decades.

“From tomorrow onwards, most of all our properties have been packed to capacity,” a senior official with the Himachal Pradesh Tourism Development Corporation (HPTDC) told IANS.

The HPTDC has 57 economy and high-end hotels across the state.

He said the arrival of the tourists in Shimla, Narkanda, Chail, Kasauli, Manali, Dalhousie, Dharamsala and Palampur is quite good.

The mountain peaks viewed from Shimla’s historic Ridge and Dharamsala and Palampur towns have been wrapped in a thick white blanket of snow.

Popular resort Manali is getting a good share of tourists as its nearby hills have plenty of snow.

Also Read: Vivo Refreshes its Budget Y Series in India

Snowfall has been eluding Shimla on Christmas since 1991 when 49 cm of snowfall fell on Christmas’ Eve. And except in 2010, there has been no white New Year’s Eve in Shimla in the past nine years.

Deforestation and pollution are blamed for the change in Shimla’s climatic conditions, says study by the India Meteorological Department.

A study conducted by Manmohan Singh, Director of Shimla’s Met office, and S.C. Bhan of the Delhi Met office, examined the snowfall trend in Shimla from 1990 to 2007.

They concluded that Shimla’s harsh winter, which normally commenced in November and ended in March, has declined after the mid-1980s. (IANS)