Tuesday October 22, 2019

Isabelle Dinoire,world’s first partial face transplant recipient dies due to cancer

49 year old, face transplant recipient dies in April after succumbing to cancer

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Isabelle Dinoire, the woman who received the world's first partial face transplant with a new nose, chin and mouth, in an operation on Nov. 27, 2005 Source:VOA
  • Isabelle Dinoire succumbed to cancer at the Amiens University Hospital
  • French doctors had stunned the world 11 years back by announcing they had given Dinoire a donor’s nose, lips, chin and parts of her cheek.
  • It is not clear if her illness was related to the transplant.

A Frenchwoman who received the world’s first partial face transplant has died, 11 years after the surgery that opened the way for dozens of other transplants worldwide.

The Amiens University Hospital in northern France announced Tuesday that Isabelle Dinoire succumbed to cancer in April.

Her family wanted the 49-year-old’s death kept private.

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The hospital did not release further details and it is not clear if her illness was related to the transplant.

But heavy use of immunosuppressant drugs had weakened her system.

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In 2005, French doctors Bernard Devauchelle and Jean-Michel Dubernard stunned the world by announcing they had given Dinoire a donor’s nose, lips, chin and parts of her cheek. She had been disfigured in a dog attack.

Dinoire’s partial face transplant sparked worldwide controversy. Critics questioned the ethics and the long-term consequences of the operation. (VOA)

Next Story

Fatty Tissues Accumulate Inside Lungs of Obese People: Study

The researchers examined post-mortem samples of the lungs that had been donated for the research and stored in the Airway Tissue Biobank

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Excess fat accumulates in the airway walls of Obese people where it takes up space and seems to increase inflammation within the lungs. Pixabay

Researchers have found that fatty tissues accumulate in the airway walls, particularly in people who are overweight or obese.

The study, published in the European Respiratory Journal, suggested that the fatty tissue alters the structure of people’s airways and this could be one reason behind the increased risk of asthma.

“Our research team studies the structure of the airways within our lungs and how these are altered in people with respiratory disease,” said the study’s author John Elliot from Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Australia.

“Looking at the samples of lungs, we spotted fatty tissue that had built up in the airway walls. We wanted to see if this accumulation was correlated with body weight,” Elliot said.

The researchers examined post-mortem samples of the lungs that had been donated for the research and stored in the Airway Tissue Biobank.

They studied samples from 52 people, including 15 who had no asthma, 21 who had the disease but died of other causes and 16 who died of asthma.

Using dyes to help visualise the structures of 1373 airways under a microscope, they identified and quantified any fatty tissue present.

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Fatty tissue alters the structure of Obese people’s airways and this could be one reason behind the increased risk of asthma. Pixabay

They compared this data with each person’s body mass index (BMI).

The study showed that fatty tissue accumulates in the walls of the airways. The analysis revealed that the amount of fat present increases in line with increasing BMI.

“We’ve found that excess fat accumulates in the airway walls where it takes up space and seems to increase inflammation within the lungs,” said the study’s co-author Peter Noble.

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“We think this is causing a thickening of the airways that limits the flow of air in and out of the lungs, and that could at least partly explain an increase in asthma symptoms,” Noble said. (IANS)