Monday January 20, 2020

Isabelle Dinoire,world’s first partial face transplant recipient dies due to cancer

49 year old, face transplant recipient dies in April after succumbing to cancer

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Isabelle Dinoire, the woman who received the world's first partial face transplant with a new nose, chin and mouth, in an operation on Nov. 27, 2005 Source:VOA
  • Isabelle Dinoire succumbed to cancer at the Amiens University Hospital
  • French doctors had stunned the world 11 years back by announcing they had given Dinoire a donor’s nose, lips, chin and parts of her cheek.
  • It is not clear if her illness was related to the transplant.

A Frenchwoman who received the world’s first partial face transplant has died, 11 years after the surgery that opened the way for dozens of other transplants worldwide.

The Amiens University Hospital in northern France announced Tuesday that Isabelle Dinoire succumbed to cancer in April.

Her family wanted the 49-year-old’s death kept private.

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The hospital did not release further details and it is not clear if her illness was related to the transplant.

But heavy use of immunosuppressant drugs had weakened her system.

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In 2005, French doctors Bernard Devauchelle and Jean-Michel Dubernard stunned the world by announcing they had given Dinoire a donor’s nose, lips, chin and parts of her cheek. She had been disfigured in a dog attack.

Dinoire’s partial face transplant sparked worldwide controversy. Critics questioned the ethics and the long-term consequences of the operation. (VOA)

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Diabetes is an Independent Risk Factor For Heart Failure: Study

According to health expert in India, if poorly controlled, diabetes leads to cardiomyopathy resulting in progressive deterioration of pumping capacity of heart

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Diabetes
The study shows that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in the community dwelling population. Pixabay

Heart problems are a common development for people with diabetes and now researchers have found that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in the community dwelling population.

According to health expert in India, if poorly controlled, diabetes leads to cardiomyopathy resulting in progressive deterioration of pumping capacity of heart.

“Diabetes is also a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and this eventually leads to blockage of coronary arteries. This leads to heart attack or myocardial infarction,” Satish Koul, HOD and Director Internal Medicine, Narayana Superspeciality Hospital, Gurugram, told IANS. “Due to myocardial infarction, the heart muscle becomes weak and eventually heart fails as a pump leading to congestive heart failure,” Koul added.

According to the current study, published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers evaluated the long-term impact of diabetes on the development of heart failure, both with preserved ejection fraction – a measurement of the percentage of blood leaving the heart with each contraction – and reduced ejection fraction. They also looked at mortality in a community population, controlling for hypertension, coronary artery disease and diastolic function.

From an initial group of 2,042 residents of Olmsted County in US, 116 study participants with diabetes were matched 1:2 for age, hypertension, sex, coronary artery disease and diastolic dysfunction to 232 participants without diabetes.

Over the 10-year follow-up period, 21 per cent of participants with diabetes developed heart failure, independent of other causes.

Diabetes
Heart problems are a common development for people with diabetes and now researchers have found that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in the community dwelling population. Pixabay

In comparison, only 12 per cent of patients without diabetes developed heart failure. Cardiac death, heart attack and stroke were not statistically different in the study between the two groups.

The study shows that diabetes is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure in the community dwelling population. Furthermore, the outcome data support the concept of a diabetic cardiomyopathy.

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This research extends previous findings and demonstrates that even without a known cardiac structural abnormality and with a normal ejection fraction, diabetic patients are still at increased risk of developing heart failure as compared to their nondiabetic counterparts. (IANS)