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Islamic terrorism: Cosmetic solutions not effective, Need is to dismantle Religion- Industrial complex

This article explains how only striking the roots of radicalism will eliminate the threat rather than targeting a piece of clothing

Burqini. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • Burkini- meets the needs of a woman following the Islamic code of dressing and having an innate affliction towards the sporting lifestyle
  • France’s recent ban on Burkini has raised questions on the adequacy of measures that need to be taken up to counter Islamic terrorism
  • Working towards stopping the Religious-Industrial complex from funding the proliferation of radical Islamism is the need of the hour to stop the rising terrorist groups

August 27, 2016: The Burkini ™ story starts, more or less, like this-

One fine morning, Ahida, the founder of the brand, was watching her niece struggling to play netball in a traditional hijab, which made her wonder about the necessity of a sporting garment suitable for a Muslim woman. In a eureka moment, she decided to supply the demands of modesty and flexibility by creating the trademark Burkini ™

The brand’s swimwear soon became a topic of media interest, which led to its exposure in different parts of Europe and Australia. The striking point which it emphasized was the ability to meet the needs of a woman following the Islamic code of dressing and having an innate affliction towards the sporting lifestyle.

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Recently, a french police had made a woman remove some of her clothing at the beach as part of the burkini ban imposed by the government in the wake of the recent terror attacks.

Nevertheless, this controversial ban is challenged by the Human Rights League and will be tried before the France’s highest administrative court. This brings us to the question of the hour- Does the Europe need to ban burqas to guarantee it’s safety? Here are two points, one should keep in mind:

I. Misinterpreting Islam– Today the anxious need to reassure the European population has driven many parts of Europe to take steps they wouldn’t have taken otherwise. The Muslim community has long been a part of Europe and showcasing them as a threat is doing more bad than good. Radical Islam and not Islam is the threat. Calls to jihad by refugees and not ladies adorning burkinis is the problem.

II. Petro-dollar as the source of Islamic extremism– Banning burqa or burkini (aesthetic aspects of a religion) seems more like a cosmetic solution to tackling Islamic terrorism. Closing borders or vetting people for cultural assimilation also are superficial measures. They create tensions and divisions.

The question here is, who funds Islamic terrorist groups? Who is behind spreading the Jehadi ideology?

Naturally, some filthy rich countries like Saudi Arabi, Kuwait and others are financing the spread of Wahhabi Islamic tentacles.

Suadi is using Petro-dollar to promote violence and unrest and spread of of fanatic Islam.

Working towards stopping this religious-industrial complexs in Saudi Arabia and the other Gulf regions from using their petrodollars to fund the proliferation of radical Islamism is the only effective way to solve the problem.

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So, we hear that Nice in France has banned burkini calling it “clothing that overtly manifests adherence to a religion”. Germany has proposed a ban on the veil in public places saying identification has now become a must.

Build the fortress, build the Berlin wall again!- but, measures that do not strike the roots of radicalism can never eliminate the threat!

– by Karishma Vanjani of NewsGram. Twitter: @BladesnBoots


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  • Kabir Chaudhary

    Muslims are being targeted and criticised by the world and there is no stopping to it.

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Facebook, Twitter Urged to Do More to Police Hate on Sites

Twitter to soon release Snapchat like feature. VOA
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Tech giants Facebook, Twitter and Google are taking steps to police terrorists and hate groups on their sites, but more work needs to be done, the Simon Wiesenthal Center said Tuesday.

The organization released its annual digital terrorism and hate report card and gave a B-plus to Facebook, a B-minus to Twitter and a C-plus to Google.

Facebook spokeswoman Christine Chen said the company had no comment on the report. Representatives for Google and Twitter did not immediately return emails seeking comment.

ALSO READ: Social Media: Here is how it is creating Lifestyle pressure on Youth!

Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay
Facebook one of the most popular apps in US. Pixabay

Rabbi Abraham Cooper, the Wiesenthal Center’s associate dean, said Facebook in particular built “a recognition that bad folks might try to use their platform” as its business model. “There is plenty of material they haven’t dealt with to our satisfaction, but overall, especially in terms of hate, there’s zero tolerance,” Cooper said at a New York City news conference.

Rick Eaton, a senior researcher at the Wiesenthal Center, said hateful and violent posts on Instagram, which is part of Facebook, are quickly removed, but not before they can be widely shared.

He pointed to Instagram posts threatening terror attacks at the upcoming World Cup in Moscow. Another post promoted suicide attacks with the message, “You only die once. Why not make it martyrdom.”

Cooper said Twitter used to merit an F rating before it started cracking down on Islamic State tweets in 2016. He said the move came after testimony before a congressional committee revealed that “ISIS was delivering 200,000 tweets a day.”

ALSO READ: Teenagers using Social Media more likely to suffer sleep deprivations: Study

This photo shows Facebook launched on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. VOA

Cooper and Eaton said that as the big tech companies have gotten more aggressive in shutting down accounts that promote terrorism, racism and anti-Semitism, promoters of terrorism and hate have migrated to other sites such as VK.com, a Facebook lookalike that’s based in Russia.

There also are “alt-tech” sites like GoyFundMe, an alternative to GoFundMe, and BitChute, an alternative to Google-owned YouTube, Cooper said.

“If there’s an existing company that will give them a platform without looking too much at the content, they’ll use it,” he said. “But if not, they are attracted to those platforms that have basically no rules.”

The Los Angeles-based Wiesenthal Center is dedicated to fighting anti-Semitism, hate, and terrorism. (VOA)