Tuesday March 19, 2019
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Islamic terrorism: Cosmetic solutions not effective, Need is to dismantle Religion- Industrial complex

This article explains how only striking the roots of radicalism will eliminate the threat rather than targeting a piece of clothing

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Burqini. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • Burkini- meets the needs of a woman following the Islamic code of dressing and having an innate affliction towards the sporting lifestyle
  • France’s recent ban on Burkini has raised questions on the adequacy of measures that need to be taken up to counter Islamic terrorism
  • Working towards stopping the Religious-Industrial complex from funding the proliferation of radical Islamism is the need of the hour to stop the rising terrorist groups

August 27, 2016: The Burkini ™ story starts, more or less, like this-

One fine morning, Ahida, the founder of the brand, was watching her niece struggling to play netball in a traditional hijab, which made her wonder about the necessity of a sporting garment suitable for a Muslim woman. In a eureka moment, she decided to supply the demands of modesty and flexibility by creating the trademark Burkini ™

The brand’s swimwear soon became a topic of media interest, which led to its exposure in different parts of Europe and Australia. The striking point which it emphasized was the ability to meet the needs of a woman following the Islamic code of dressing and having an innate affliction towards the sporting lifestyle.

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Recently, a french police had made a woman remove some of her clothing at the beach as part of the burkini ban imposed by the government in the wake of the recent terror attacks.

Nevertheless, this controversial ban is challenged by the Human Rights League and will be tried before the France’s highest administrative court. This brings us to the question of the hour- Does the Europe need to ban burqas to guarantee it’s safety? Here are two points, one should keep in mind:

I. Misinterpreting Islam– Today the anxious need to reassure the European population has driven many parts of Europe to take steps they wouldn’t have taken otherwise. The Muslim community has long been a part of Europe and showcasing them as a threat is doing more bad than good. Radical Islam and not Islam is the threat. Calls to jihad by refugees and not ladies adorning burkinis is the problem.

II. Petro-dollar as the source of Islamic extremism– Banning burqa or burkini (aesthetic aspects of a religion) seems more like a cosmetic solution to tackling Islamic terrorism. Closing borders or vetting people for cultural assimilation also are superficial measures. They create tensions and divisions.

The question here is, who funds Islamic terrorist groups? Who is behind spreading the Jehadi ideology?

Naturally, some filthy rich countries like Saudi Arabi, Kuwait and others are financing the spread of Wahhabi Islamic tentacles.

Suadi is using Petro-dollar to promote violence and unrest and spread of of fanatic Islam.

Working towards stopping this religious-industrial complexs in Saudi Arabia and the other Gulf regions from using their petrodollars to fund the proliferation of radical Islamism is the only effective way to solve the problem.

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So, we hear that Nice in France has banned burkini calling it “clothing that overtly manifests adherence to a religion”. Germany has proposed a ban on the veil in public places saying identification has now become a must.

Build the fortress, build the Berlin wall again!- but, measures that do not strike the roots of radicalism can never eliminate the threat!

– by Karishma Vanjani of NewsGram. Twitter: @BladesnBoots

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Chefs Gear Up For Pairing With Scientists To Promote Sustainable Eating

In Europe, research fellow Laura Wellesley of British think-tank Chatham House says governments must aid in a shift to so-called plant-based meat and, more controversially, meat grown in laboratories.

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Diners sample vegan dishes at a "Future 50 Foods" tasting at the Pompidou Center in Paris. VOA

Spelt risotto was on the menu at a recent lunch in Paris. Spelt is an ancient form of wheat with a nutty flavor. It is rich in fiber and minerals, and counts among dozens of sometimes ancient and obscure foods scientists say benefit people and the planet.

A green cuisine effort is growing in France as scientists warn that meat consumption must be drastically cut to fight climate change and sustainably feed a global human population set to reach 10 billion by 2050.

Algae, which are nutrient-rich and can have a meat-like flavor, is seen at a "Future 50 Foods" tasting at the Pompidou Center in Paris.
Algae, which are nutrient-rich and can have a meat-like flavor, is seen at a “Future 50 Foods” tasting at the Pompidou Center in Paris. VOA

“Seventy-five percent of our food comes from 12 crops and five animals. Sixty percent of all our calories come through three vegetables,” said David Edwards, director of food strategy at environmental group WWF, which jointly produced a report, “Future 50 Foods,” with the German food giant Knorr.

The message: Our current eating habits, which rely heavily on large-scale farming and livestock production, have got to change.

“We’ve had a 60 percent decline in the wildlife population since the 1970s — the last 50 years, within a lifetime,” Edwards added. “And … a precipitous decline in insect populations also … food has pushed wildlife into the extreme margins.”

A menu explains what is being served at a "Future 50 Foods" lunch at the Pompidou Center in Paris.
A menu explains what is being served at a “Future 50 Foods” lunch at the Pompidou Center in Paris. VOA

The Paris lunch featured many of the report’s so-called “future” foods. Vegetables are in. Meat is out. On the menu: walnuts, root vegetables, lentil flour, yams and soy milk.

Also, fonio — a drought-resistant grain that Senegalese chef Pierre Thiam now markets in the United States and serves at his New York City restaurant. He sources it from smallholder farmers in Africa.

“We’re still importing food like rice in Senegal. Yet we could have our own fonio, our own millet. We should be consuming it. But we still have this mentality that what comes from the West is best,” Thiam said.

Senegalese chef Pierre Thiam attends a "Future 50 Foods" tasting at the Pompidou Center in Paris. Thiam cooks and markets fonio in the U.S., sourcing the grain from African farmers.
Senegalese chef Pierre Thiam attends a “Future 50 Foods” tasting at the Pompidou Center in Paris. Thiam cooks and markets fonio in the U.S., sourcing the grain from African farmers. VOA

Former White House chef Sam Kass, who led Michelle Obama’s campaign against childhood obesity, is now fighting for the environment.

“When we talk about these dramatic changes to overhaul everything, people are like, ‘I don’t know what you’re talking about, I don’t know what to do.’ And here, it’s like, just pick 2 to 3 foods and eat them once a week. That would be a big start,” Kass said.

Drought-resistant okra is displayed at a "Future 50 Foods" tasting at the Pompidou Center in Paris.
Drought-resistant okra is displayed at a “Future 50 Foods” tasting at the Pompidou Center in Paris. VOA

In Europe, research fellow Laura Wellesley of British think-tank Chatham House says governments must aid in a shift to so-called plant-based meat and, more controversially, meat grown in laboratories.

“The EU has really invested quite heavily in this area … but it could do more,” Wellesley said. “It could invest more public finance in the research and development of culture and plant-based meat that are truly sustainable and are healthy options. And it could also support the commercialization of innovations.”

At the Paris lunch, diner Thomas Blomme gave his first course a thumbs-up.

Also Read: India Should Crack Down Upon The Terror Sympathizers Within The Country

“Some sort of soup, with a lot of spices and some new ingredients. Tasted really well with some lentils,” he said.

And for diners heading back to work but feeling a bit sleepy after the seven-course tasting menu: A green moringa after-party booster juice was offered. (VOA)