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Igor and Denver are the rhino pioneers and the main heroes of this project. Pixabay

A global collaborative and innovative project using nuclear science to prevent/reduce rhinos poaching has been launched recently in which Russia’s integrated nuclear power player Rosatom a key partner. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) is also a partner.

According to Russia’s integrated nuclear power company Rosatom, the anti-poaching `Rhisotope Project’ was initiated by the University of Witwatersrand (WIT) and is being implemented under a global collaboration with the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Colorado State University (USA), Rosatom (Russian Federation) and the Nuclear Energy Corporation of South Africa (NECSA) as well as global scientists, researchers, South African rhino owners and veterinary surgeon Dr. William Fowlds.


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Rosatom is the key supporter and partner in the project that was launched at the magnificent Buffalo Kloof Private Game Reserve, South Africa, which is also an important collaborator in the project. Under the project’s first phase a trace amount of completely harmless stable isotopes was carefully introduced into the horns of two rhinos.

For the next three months scientists will monitor the rhinos and analyze various samples to understand how the isotope interacts within the horn and the animal, Rosatom said. “The key aspect of this research will be to confirm that by introducing radioactive isotopes into the horns of these rare and beautiful animals it will cause them no harm. Computer and phantom modeling will also be used to confirm this as well as identify the appropriate radioactive isotope and quantity to be used,” Rosatom added.


Rosatom is the key supporter and partner in the project that was launched at the magnificent Buffalo Kloof Private Game Reserve. Pixabay

Igor and Denver are the rhino pioneers and the main heroes of this project. Igor is named after Igor Kurchatov, a Soviet nuclear physicist who contributed greatly to the development of civil nuclear technology as we know it today. Denver is named after the capital of Colorado, in honor of the efforts provided by Colorado State University (USA) in the project.

“One of the very few countries in the world, where you can come and see the big five. We’ve got to work hard to maintain that for the two reasons in the industry: for the people’s employment, for the benefit of everyone who lives and works around the game farm. You have to realize that you can shoot a rhino once, but if you shoot it with a camera, you can do it a hundred times, a thousand times and people will keep coming back to see these beautiful animals, that’s jobs for a lot of people, that’s the growth of the economy,” Professor James Larkin, Director at the Radiation and Health Physics Unit at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg said.

The Rhisotope Project is multifaceted and relies on the following key principles, demand reduction and horn devaluation, community upliftment and investment, education as well as rhino research and data collection. By focusing on these principles, the project aims to decrease the demand for rhino horns on the international market as well as make the horn more detectable when crossing international borders.


We believe that science and particularly nuclear science will play a fundamental role in not only protecting the rhino but our planet in general. Pixabay

With over 10,000 radiation detection devices installed at various ports of entry across the globe, experts are confident that this project will make the transportation of horns incredibly difficult and will substantially increase the likelihood of identifying and arresting smugglers. Once the research work has been completed and a proof of concept has been demonstrated, this technique will then be offered to both state and private rhino owners on the African continent and globally.

ALSO READ: Scientists Creating Hybrids To Save Rhinos From Extinction

The intellectual property, as well as training and assistance, will be made freely available to conservation organizations who may wish to utilize this process to further protect their animals from poaching. “We are incredibly proud to play a fundamental role in this amazing initiative, which has the potential to save this incredible species from certain extinction,” noted Ryan Collyer, CEO of Rosatom Central and Southern Africa.

“We are also humbled by the fact that science is able to transcend boundaries, borders, and politics as shown by this global initiative in a race against the plight of the African rhino. We believe that science and particularly nuclear science will play a fundamental role in not only protecting the rhino but our planet in general,” he added. (IANS/JC)


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