Monday January 20, 2020
Home World Israeli occup...

Israeli occupation of Palestine: Retracing the organized subversion of human rights

0
//

3819112_370

By Gaurav Sharma

What began as an extensive persecution of Jews in the Middle Ages in the form raging anti-semitism has now transformed into a morbid crackdown on Palestinians.

Palestine represents the world’s largest refugee population, most of whom are poor, powerless, and homeless. Unemployment is rampant, with a record 67 percent of the youth population without a job to provide for their basic needs. Homes lie in shambles, bombed by the incessant flow of missiles fired from Israel-occupied regions in the West Bank.

To aggravate the situation, most of the promised $3.5 billion foreign aid does not reach the target audience (almost three-fourth of the amount is diverted to the Palestinian Authority, a puppet regime in West Bank).

Jewish uprising

The crisis which has snowballed into flagrant human rights abuses by the Israeli regime traces it roots to the resurgence of Zionism in the early 20th Century, in line with the long-standing demands of a ‘return to Zion.’

Zionism began as Jewish nationalist movement under the vision of Theodor Herzl, an Austrian-Jewish journalist who galvanized the brewing jingoism into a mass movement in 1896.

By organizing meetings and penning down vocal essays, Herzl was able to magnetize Jews living in Europe to what now stands as Israel / Palestine. To escape the jaws of European persecution, the Jews heeded Herzl’s clarion calls for a national homeland and migrated to what was then an Arab and Muslim dominated territory under the control of the Ottoman empire (which was later transferred to the British).

Through a heady mix of anti-semitism and religious nationalism, the Jewish population in Israel/Palestine sharply escalated between 1896 and 1948. The Arabs saw the mass immigration of Jews as a European colonial movement and a war soon ensued.

herzl
Theodor Herzl, father of modern political Zionism

Division of state

Unable to stymie the violence, Britain devised a partition policy wherein Palestine would control West Bank and the Gaza strip and the rest of the land would be transferred to Israel.

While the Jewish population accepted the deal, Arabs viewed the agreement as an insidious plan to displace them from their rightful land. Subsequently in 1967, the Arab states of Egypt, Jordan, Syria, and Iraq launched a war against Israel, though not before terming it as an aggressor.

Israel, on its part, asserted that it had launched the attack as a pre-emptive measure. During the Six Day war (as it is popularly known), Israel crushed the Arab powers and assumed control of West Bank and East Jerusalem. More than 77 percent of the land came under the territory of Israel. In the aftermath of the sinister battle, a massive 700,000 Palestinian civilians transfigured into refugees.

To address grievances of the displaced populace, the United Nations Security Council adopted resolution 242, asking Israel to withdraw from ‘the territories’ (French translation) occupied. The US and Israel used instead the English translation of the text to argue that withdrawal from some, and not all the usurped area would suffice.

Meanwhile, to govern the Palestinian population in West Bank and Gaza, Israel organized a military establishment through which civil rights and political liberties such as freedom of speech and expression, press, and association were denied to the Palestinians.

1300
Six Day War: June 5-10, 1967

Intifida and Human rights abuse

Following the subversion and criminalization of Palestinian nationalism, an Intifida (shaking off) movement was mobilized by the Palestinian community. During the mass unrest, Israel arrested people by the dozen. (Israel had the highest per-capita prison population in the world)

A secret policy of targeted killing was undertaken by Israel. Violence within the Palestinian community also escalated, with the rift between the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO, the official representative of the Palestinians) and Hamas (an Islamist organization deemed as a terrorist group) spilling out in the open.

Despite the 1993 Oslo 2 agreements dividing the West Bank into a shared territory (besides giving complete control of one area to Israel), Israel has launched sweeping offensives in the Gaza strip, killing thousands of Palestinians. Hamas has retaliated with much less fire-power.

As of now, the Gaza strip is under the control of Hamas and the West Bank is ruled by the mainstream Fateh faction of the PLO.

Meanwhile, in the midst of the apathy of diplomatic amnesia, refugees which include young children, helpless women, and old residents have been subjected to barbaric human rights abuse.

Human Rights Watch, a global human rights advocacy group, has documented cases where boys belonging to the tender age group of 10-15 years were threatened, mercilessly beaten-up, stripped, and jailed. (a gross violation of Article 14 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political rights ratified by Israel in 1991)

w460
‘Mowing the lawn,’ an euphemism for Israeli oppression in Palestine

A Unicef report further underscores the plight of the refugees in a 2013 report wherein the uncertainty and instability of the future of Palestinian children is highlighted.

Chris Hedges, a Pulitzer prize-winning author, calls the peace process a ‘sham’ and defines Israel as a ‘corrupt oligarchic regime for whom war has become a lucrative business.’

The allegations are not far-fetched keeping in mind the 390,000 tank shells, 5 million bullets, and 35,000 artillery shells that were blasted by Israel during the 51-day Gaza siege in 2014.

More recently, a one-and-a-half-year old Palestinian infant was charred to death in what has been defined as a clear case of Jewish terrorism. The brutal episode is however not an isolated case of brazen violence.

Following the execution of three Jewish students in West Bank, Israel launched a full-scale invasion of Gaza and administered an even more sinister campaign to blockade food deliveries, thereby ensuring the survival of Palestinians just above starvation levels. The periodic rocket shelling which has shattered the lives of the Palestinians is meanwhile callously dubbed as ‘mowing the lawn.

As far as counter-charges of Hamas wreaking havoc in Israel go, the disparity in the efficacy of attacks is precociously prominent. Compared to the 20-40 tonnes of firepower that Hamas used through its widely inaccurate missile strikes, Israel pummelled 20,000 tonnes of explosives in Gaza.

The only feasible way to prevent Israel from continuing the horrific hounding of Palestinians is through imposition of sanctions, such as those that brought down the apartheid regime in South Africa.

However, with the US backing Israeli-occupation of Palestine, it is highly unlikely that the BDS movement, a global campaign to exert political and economic pressure on Israel to leave Palestinian land, would succeed.

And yet, there is no other way to arrest the fall of the Palestinian people.

Next Story

Here’s how Diplomats can Improve Diplomacy in India

Diplomats can do with better home connectivity

0
Diplomacy India
Diplomacy can be helpful to advance and develop India. Pixabay

BY D.C. PATHAK

Diplomacy primarily is an instrument for advancing the cause of the nation’s economic and security policy — foreign policy quite simply is the product of the country’s economic and security concerns. The government of the day formulates a policy accordingly and our envoys implement it with all the suavity they can bring to bear in the handling of foreign entities. Sometimes a doctrinaire approach could override the national security angle — Prime Minister I.K. Gujral adopted a Pak policy that ignored the available Intelligence to the effect that Pak ISI had planned to replicate the success of Afghan Jehad in Kashmir by pumping in Mujahideen into the Valley. The ‘covert’ offensive of Pakistan later developed into the Kargil invasion.

Normally speaking, however, our foreign policy — even though it has inputs from abroad — is formulated at home taking into account what is good or adverse for the nation. Our diplomats also, therefore, would do well not only to have a total picture of India’s security threat scenario but also a well grounded knowledge of domestic developments that impinged on India’s national integration, internal security and domestic stability in a strategic sense. The course of events in sensitive areas like Kashmir, North East and Sikkim — apart from happenings on our borders — that could attract international attention have to be closely tracked by them in an ongoing fashion. Diplomacy has to fully grasp the wider bearings of these domestic episodes to be able to measure up to the task of handling the perceptions of the world community on them — wherever it became necessary.

India Diplomats
The foreign policy of India is formulated at home taking into account what is good or adverse for the nation. Pixabay

‘Mission and delivery’ — the words used by Prime Minister Modi in his recent address to the Probationers of Indian Civil Services including the IFS, at Kevadia in Gujarat on the National Unity Day, are significant both for the members of the foreign policy establishment as well as the bureaucracy working on the home turf. A correct understanding of the objective that a diplomat or a bureaucrat was to serve in any position and do it in the best possible way, is crucial for success.

The system of updating our diplomats on the readings of our external and internal situation is already in existence and it includes, among other things, regular briefings provided to them by our National Security set-up and the ministries concerned. It is in this context that the reported remarks of a senior Indian diplomat at Washington on the situation in Kashmir — as it prevailed after the abrogation of Art 370 of the Constitution by Parliament — have raised eyebrows within and outside the government. At a dinner meeting with people connected with a forthcoming Indian film on Kashmir that focused on the plight of Kashmiri Pandits, he is said to have held out an assurance that the latter could return to the Valley soon adding that ‘if the Israeli people can do it, we can also do it’ and that ‘it has happened in the Middle East’. The audience had many Kashmiri Pandits who complemented Prime Minister Modi for showing the courage to declare that ‘we don’t need Art 370 and 35A’.

Now, by no stretch of imagination, can Jammu and Kashmir, which is a state of India, invite comparison with Israel and Palestine — two countries carved out of a common land. Even if the Valley is preponderantly Muslim and Jammu is dominated by Hindus, they are parts of the same integral state that belongs to India. The ouster of Kashmiri Pandits from the Valley is known to have been caused by the Pak ISI-controlled militants at a time when Pakistan had called for Jehad in Kashmir. The democratic leadership elected to rule the state of J&K was complicit with the Pak agents and separatists in permitting the atrocities on the Kashmiri Pandits who had to migrate to another part of the state for shelter — not to another country across the borders. They became refugees in their own state because of the government’s failure to give them protection — they were not like the Jews ousted by the Palestinian authority from its country. In the case of Kashmiri Pandits, it is now a question of the government of J&K as well as the Centre correcting a grave wrong of the past and ensuring — in the post-370 environ — that they felt free to come back to the Valley and resettle there in total protection. This, in turn, is connected with the success of counter-terror operations and elimination of Pak agents from the state. The sovereign Indian State has to do this — regardless of whatever it takes to accomplish the task.

India BRICS
India is a member of BRICS. Pixabay

The Indian diplomat probably intended to only convey that strongest measures will be taken to resettle the Kashmiri Pandits in the face of a continuing threat of terrorism in the Valley. The unintended parallel with the Israel-Palestine scenario that he drew tended to give an international dimension to Kashmir — this is the whole point about understanding the strategic import of an issue at home. The democratic world led by US had already accepted the integration of J&K with the rest of the country as an internal matter of India. J&K is not divided in a Hindu part and a Muslim territory and is an integral state housing many faiths. A communally-based outcome of the ‘Kashmir issue’ as propagated by Pakistan can never be accepted by democratic India.

There is no damage done but the takeaway from all of this is that Indian diplomats have to remain constantly grounded in what was happening within the country. It is a matter of great satisfaction that the Centre has enriched the content of the Foundation Course at Lal Bahadur Shastri National Academy of Administration (LBSNAA) at Mussoorie in terms of the inclusion of presentations on strategic affairs and India’s national security.

Also Read- Here’s How Bollywood Reacts to CAA Protests

This course is the common initial phase of training for all Civil Services, including the IFS, and gives them a lasting base of knowledge of all that was happening in the country as well as the outside world, in these spheres. Subsequent interactions between the Ministry of Home Affairs and the Ministry of External Affairs, if held in a more organised way — possibly under the aegis of National Security Council Secretariat(NSCS) — should help to keep our diplomatic establishment abreast of all the internal developments here that could have a bearing on our foreign policy. (IANS)