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Italian football clubs under probe for tax fraud

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Naples: In an investigation targeted at dozens of clubs in top three football divisions in Italy, around 12 million euros worth assets from 58 individuals were seized by Italian tax police as alleged tax evasion.

The investigations were impounded after the request of prosecutors in Naples. The assets included cash, clubs and real estate. Assets seized were of a total of 64 people over an alleged tax fraud scheme.

The Investigation was started after the transfer of Lavezzi from Napoli and after the Paris Saint-German reported the probe regularly in 2012, which appears to involve 35 clubs in Serie A, Serie B and Lega Pro.

Aurelio De Laurentiis, Lazio owner Claudio Lotito, Serie A leaders Napoli, AC Milan director general Adriano Galliani, former Argentina international and Modena coach Herman Crespo, and Jean Claude Blanc, who manages Paris Saint-German are under investigation.

Several present as well as former Serie A players including Argentinian forward Ezequiel Lavezzi, Lazio agent Alessandro Moggi are also allegedly under probe along with Palermo owner Maurizio Zamparini, former Parma president Tommaso Ghirardi, former Juventus president Jean Claude Blanc.

According to prosecutors, instead of splitting with players, agents also charged entirely to the clubs.

While some marginal benefits for players were avoided by the system, the clubs then decreased the fees from their tax payments, prosecutors added.

In Italy, some Argentinean agents also avoided taxation by setting up with companies and by using wrong end documents.

Lazio’s lawyer Gian Michele Gentile said that they also don’t have any information regarding this as they also got to know through Media.

Lazio and Atalanta denied the ‘wrongdoing’ and said that they have full faith in the investigation.(Inputs from agencies)

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Child Vaccination Mandate Still Under The Confusion Reigns in Italy

According to a 2010 survey of 27 EU states, plus Norway and Iceland, 15 countries do not have any mandatory vaccinations; the other 14 have at least one

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A doctor injects vaccine into a patient's arm, in Rome, Italy, Feb. 23, 2018.
A doctor injects vaccine into a patient's arm, in Rome, Italy, Feb. 23, 2018. (VOA)

Italians are divided between those who think parents should have the right to decide whether to vaccinate their children and those who feel immunization programs must be decided by the government, which they believe has better access to information. Vaccine regulations differ widely across Europe, and the current situation in Italy is in limbo.

Italians enrolling their children in state-run nursery schools currently are uncertain if they need to provide evidence their children have had 10 vaccinations required by a law that came into effect in March. A week ago, the upper house of parliament voted through an amendment to remove that obligation. But to become law, it must also be approved by the lower house.

Parents have been told that for the time being they can simply provide a self-signed declaration that their children have been vaccinated. Many remain unclear whether their children will be allowed to go to school if they fail to provide a declaration or other evidence of the vaccinations.

A surge of more than 5,000 measles cases last year – the second largest outbreak in Europe – led the government run then by the Democratic Party to pass a bill requiring mandatory vaccinations. However, in the run-up to general elections this year, the 5-Star Movement led by Luigi Di Maio and the League led by Matteo Salvini said they would do away with the law. Now in power, they appear to be keeping their promise

Speaking at a recent political rally near Florence, Salvini admitted he had vaccinated his own children and said that parents who have the best interests of their children at heart should be able to make that choice. He added that 10 vaccines are simply too many for some children and it is unthinkable that Italian children may not be able to enroll in school because they have not been vaccinated.

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Confusion Reigns in Italy Over Child Vaccination Mandate. VOA

Salvini said a state that requires 10 vaccines must also give parents the certainty that nothing will happen to their children through pre-vaccine tests, which today do not exist. There are 15 European countries, he added, that do not even have a single mandatory vaccine. Noting that Italy now has the most compulsory vaccinations of any country in Europe, Salvini expressed the concern that some multinational or pharmaceutical company may have chosen Italian children as a testing ground.

Italy’s health minister, Giulia Grillo, a doctor and a member of the 5-Star Movement, has made clear the government believes the right balance must be struck between the right to education and the right to health.

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Grillo said the 5-Star Movement is not opposed to vaccines and recognizes their importance and usefulness. She added that citizens need to be informed properly about vaccinations and that the National Health Service must provide support to parents and children before and after they are inoculated.

According to a 2010 survey of 27 EU states, plus Norway and Iceland, 15 countries do not have any mandatory vaccinations; the other 14 have at least one. The most common mandatory vaccine is against polio, followed by diphtheria and tetanus. (VOA)

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