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Italian Supreme Court ruled against a Sikh Migrant who wanted to carry a Kirpan in Public

The Sikh man in the case was appealing against another court's decision ordering him to pay a 2,000 euro fine ($2,195)

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Sikh Community, Wikimedia

Rome, May 16, 2017: The Italian Supreme Court has ruled against a Sikh migrant who wanted to carry a kirpan in public.

The court on Monday said migrants who choose to live in Italy must respect Italian laws prohibiting the carrying of weapons even though Sikhs regard kirpan as sacred.

The court, while acknowledging that diversity in a multi-ethnic society is important, ruled that “public safety from weapons was of paramount importance and superseded an individual’s rights”, BBC reported.

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The Sikh man in the case was appealing against another court’s decision ordering him to pay a 2,000 euro fine ($2,195) because he had been caught leaving his home in Goito, northern Italy, armed with a kirpan measuring nearly 20cm, the Italian media reported.

The man had argued that his kirpan as well as his turban were symbols of his religion and wearing them was part of his religious duty.

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But the court in Rome ruled that migrants must ensure that their beliefs are legally compatible with host countries.

“(While) the multi-ethnic society is a necessity, public safety is an asset to be protected,” the court ruled. (IANS)

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  • vedika kakar

    Italy should consider all religions, they should atleast come to a consensus

Next Story

California to Require Public Universities to Offer Abortion Pills at Campus Health Centers

California's Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday signed the bill into law, which requires the states' 34 universities to offer abortion medication beginning]

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California, Public, Universities
FILE - People rally in support of abortion rights at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., May 21, 2019. VOA

California has become the first state to require public universities to offer abortion pills at campus health centers.

California’s Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday signed the bill into law, which requires the states’ 34 universities to offer abortion medication beginning in 2023.

The medication is a first-trimester procedure that involves a woman taking two pills to create an effect similar to a miscarriage.

Newsom’s predecessor, Jerry Brown, who is also a Democrat, vetoed similar legislation last year, arguing that abortion services were “widely available off-campus” and so did not need to be provided by state universities.

California, Public, Universities
FILE – California Gov. Gavin Newsom addresses a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., July 23, 2019. VOA

Democratic Senator Connie Leyva, who sponsored the bill, said in a statement Friday, “Abortion is a protected right, and it is important that everyone, including college students, have access to that right, if they so choose.”

Leyva has argued the bill would help young women who cannot get to outside abortion providers because of transportation or financial obstacles.

The bill has been opposed by religious and anti-abortion groups.

The University of California system has not taken a position on the matter but has raised concerns about the cost of the procedure as well as concerns over security issues related to providing abortions.

Also Read- Light Smoking also Damages Lungs, Says Study

The law does not require California universities to offer surgical abortions, which can be done past the first trimester.

Abortion medication can only be administered during the first trimester. It is different from the morning after pill, which is already available at many university health centers across the country. The morning after pill is taken after sex to block a pregnancy before it begins, while abortion medication ends a pregnancy after it has begun.

California’s decision to increase access to abortion comes at a time when many states are limiting the ability of women to receive abortions, leading to a flurry of legal challenges. Last week, the Supreme Court agreed to review a Louisiana law that opponents say would force most of the abortion clinics in the state to close. (VOA)