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Iter fusion power project: Scientists creating their own ‘Sun’ to tackle future energy problems

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

In southern France, engineers and scientists are creating a “mini- star,” which can produce the same reactions that take place in the sun, to provide energy for the future.

This interesting project is named ‘Iter,’ which means ‘the way’ in Latin, to underline the possibilities of energy as a means to create a peaceful and safe environment.

As reported by The Independent, the ‘star’ will weigh thrice as much as the Eiffel Tower and as big as 60 football pitches. A nuclear reactor will be placed inside the building, which will generate power through smaller and controlled versions of nuclear fusions. The power thus generated will be clean, safe to use and will lessen the over-exploitation of fossil fuels.

In 1987, ‘Iter’ was first introduced to the world in its primary stage. However, the project was delayed due to various problems.

Currently, it is being supported by seven entities, including European Union, US, Russia and China.

The group working on this project has also appointed a new head, Bernard Bigot, early this year.

The website reported Bigot as stating, “We are now entering into manufacturing and preparations for assembly.”

He added that he had joined as a part of a new management team that was set up to deliver “both a research and an industrial facility.”

The team involved in the project is expecting that preliminary operations can begin by the 2020s, followed by the production of energy after some time.

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Parker Solar Probe Passes by Venus On Its Way to Sun: NASA

Twenty-four orbits — dipping into the sun's upper atmosphere, or corona — are planned over the next seven years.

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Parker Solar Probe, NASA, mercury
This illustration from NASA shows the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. VOA

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is swinging by Venus on its unprecedented journey to the sun.

Launched in August, the spacecraft gets a gravity assist Wednesday as it passes within 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) of Venus. The flyby is the first of seven that will draw Parker ever closer to the sun.

By the end of October, Parker will shatter the current record for close solar encounters, set by a NASA spacecraft in 1976 from 27 million miles (43 million kilometers) out.

Parker-Solar-2, NASA
The Parker Solar Probe sits in a clean room at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla., after the installation of its heat shield. VOA

Parker will get within 15 million miles (25 million kilometers) of the sun’s surface in November.

Also Read: SpaceX Names Yusaku Maezawa As Their Private Passenger

Twenty-four such orbits — dipping into the sun’s upper atmosphere, or corona — are planned over the next seven years. The gap will eventually shrink to 3.8 million miles (6 million kilometers). (VOA)