Tuesday July 23, 2019
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Jammu and Kashmir job panel to go digital

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Srinagar,  The Jammu and Kashmir Public Service Commission (JKPSC), an autonomous body tasked with recruiting gazetted officers in the state, is all set to use technology to cut the gestation period in selection processes and screenings.

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According to Commission chairman Latief-uz-Zaman Deva, this is being done to overcome delays in selection processes due to age-old manual means of document checking and eligibility determination and repletion of the processes.

a one-time registration process of candidates has been introduced. Under this, the candidature remains alive once an aspirant registers for a job vacancy after completing the eligibility conditions. The candidate would continue to receive system generated job alerts through SMS or email till he or she attains the upper age limit or gets a job.

“The Commission has also proposed introduction of online submission and collection of application forms for the posts advertised.

This would considerably quicken the process of shortlisting and screening candidates, which otherwise would take months and even a year or so if the number of candidates applying was large. It would also reduce the overall gestation period of selections.

Further, admit cards and other communications would be sent to candidates through the electronic mode with the introduction of e-admit cards and e-summon letters. “This way, the old method of sending these through post, which would take weeks to reach the candidates, would be dispensed with,” the official stated.

The Commission might also conduct the various examinations online as is being done by recruiting agencies elsewhere to save time and pace up the process.

(IANS)

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Would You Give Up Digital Life if Given Lifetime Data Protection?

Many prefer not to have certain facts about themselves revealed in public

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Digital, Life, Data
Several years ago, people shared their private information with social media services in exchange for various benefits, without even thinking about the potential threats. Pixabay

Would you give up your digital life if all your personal information – passwords, posts, pictures, videos, jokes, memes, GIFs etc – remain private for the rest of your life or given back to you, with no duplicate data saved in the Dark Web?

For four in 10 people (38 per cent), this is a steal deal as consumers’ personal information is becoming incredibly valuable to them, says a latest report from global cybersecurity firm Kaspersky.

Social media services like Facebook, Instagram or Twitter have become a significant part of our lives and according to Kaspersky’s report, 82 per cent of people now use them globally.

Several years ago, people shared their private information with social media services in exchange for various benefits, without even thinking about the potential threats and their consequences.

Digital, Life, Data
For four in 10 people (38 per cent), this is a steal deal as consumers’ personal information is becoming incredibly valuable. Pixabay

“With a rising number of data leaks around the world, we are seeing a new trend among consumers. Many prefer not to have certain facts about themselves revealed in public and are paying more attention to the information they share with online services,” says Marina Titova, Head of Consumer Product Marketing at Kaspersky.

However, the majority still don’t know how to protect their digital privacy and would give up social media to guarantee their information remains secure.

The truth is: Your data is up for grabs everywhere – be it tech companies, advertisers or marketers.

After facing flak for using unethical and discreet ways of collecting user-information, Facebook has now decided to pay Android users in India and the US just to monitor how they use their phones.

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The social networking giant has launched a new app called Study which is available for download on Google’s Play Store for Android users aged 18 and above.

The app would not only monitor installed apps on a person’s phone but also observe the amount of time spent on those apps along with details like the users’ location and additional app data which could reveal other specific features being used.

Earlier this year, it was revealed that Facebook was secretly paying users aged 13 to 35 up to $20 per month, plus referral fees, to install a “Facebook Research” Virtual Private Network (VPN) that was letting the company access user’s data.

According to Kaspersky’s report titled, “The true value of digital privacy: are consumers selling themselves short?”, fears surrounding protecting digital privacy have made consumers more anxious about the use and distribution of their personal information on the Internet.

Digital, Life, Data
Social media services like Facebook, Instagram or Twitter have become a significant part of our lives. Pixabay

However, despite these various benefits, some would still opt out of social media if it helped to restore their digital privacy forever.

One in 10 (12 per cent) people who give away their personal information to register for fun quizzes, such as what celebrity they look like or what their favourite meal is, would not be able to do so anymore.

It may be even more problematic, though, for 58 per cent people who would no longer be able to use their social login details to quickly and conveniently authorize themselves on different websites or services.

Perhaps even more surprisingly, at a time when the number of mobile phone users is rising 2 per cent year-on-year, one-in-five (19 per cent) would be ready to wave goodbye to their handsets altogether to guarantee their data remains private for the rest of their life.

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Unfortunately, even sacrificing your entire social media presence wouldn’t be sufficient to protect digital privacy an it’s a process, not a one-time deal that can be bargained for.

“Keeping personal information safe – by regularly updating social media account passwords and using security solutions – will give consumers more confidence in the security of their data online,” said Titova. (IANS)