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Jharkhand Governor Draupadi Murmu pledges to donate Eyes at Run of Vision programme by Kashyap Memorial Eye Hospital

Till now 426 people have donated eyes to KMEH out of which 366 have been transplanted successfully

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Kashyap Memorial Eye Hospital. Image source: Facebook
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Ranchi, Septemeber 03, 2016: Jharkhand Governor Draupadi Murmu announced on Saturday that she will donate her eyes at the Run of Vision programme organised by Kashyap Memorial Eye Hospital (KMEH), Ranchi.

Talking to IANS, Dr Bharti Kashyap, Medical Director of the KMEH said: “We are obliged that governor madam announced to donate her eyes so that a blind person can see the world. We express our deep gratitude to the governor.”

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“We have been organising Run For Vision programme for the last 11 years to create awareness among people of the state to donate their eyes. According to reports, in our country every year 25,000 to 30,000 people suffer from blindness due to cornea related problems. Cornea cannot be purchased and can only be transplanted from one human being to another,” she added.

Till now 426 people have donated eyes to KMEH out of which 366 have been transplanted successfully.

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Leaders who have announced to donate eyes to KMEH include Congress leader Jairam Ramesh, former Chief Minister and BJP leader Arjun Munda among others.

Speaking on the occasion, the governor said: “Of the 37 million people suffering from blindness in the world 10 million are from India. There is a need to create awareness by organising camps.” (IANS)

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  • Arya Sharan

    Great move by the leaders, it will increase awareness about eye donation and will consequently help the blind population.

Next Story

Treating blindness with stem cell therapy

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Stem cells will now treat blindness. Pixabay
Stem cells will now treat blindness. Pixabay

Stem cell-derived retinal cells can now be used to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These advances have been made my a team of scientists led by a person of Indian origin.

Findings

  • Tiny tube-like protrusions called primary cilia on cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) — a layer of cells in the back of the eye — are essential for the survival of the retina’s light-sensing photoreceptors.
  • This may help scientists to use induced-pluripotent stem cells to create adult RPE for transplants to treat patients with geographic atrophy, otherwise known as dry AMD.

“We now have a better idea about how to generate and replace RPE cells, which appear to be among the first type of cells to stop working properly in AMD,” said lead researcher Kapil Bharti, Stadtman Investigator at the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

The results have been incorporated into the group's protocol for making clinical-grade RPE stem cells. Wikimedia commons
The results have been incorporated into the group’s protocol for making clinical-grade RPE stem cells. Wikimedia commons

How they go about it

  • In geographic atrophy, RPE cells die, which causes photoreceptors to degenerate, leading to vision loss.
  • The team hopes to halt the degeneration and reverse the progression of geographic atrophy, by replacing diseased the RPE with lab-made RPE.
  • The team tested three drugs known to modulate the growth of primary cilia on stem cells-derived RPE.
  • However, these RPE cells have a tendency to get developmentally stuck.
  • The cells frequently fail to mature into functional RPE capable of supporting photoreceptors. In cases where they do mature, however, RPE maturation coincides with the emergence of primary cilia on the induced-pluripotent stem cells-RPE cells.
  • They found that the two drugs known to enhance cilia growth significantly improved the structural and functional maturation of the RPE stem cells, while the cells exposed to the third drug, demonstrated severely disrupted structure and functionality.

The results have been incorporated into the group’s protocol for making clinical-grade RPE stem cells, Bharti said.

The study was published in journal Cell Reports. (IANS)