Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×

New Delhi: The controversial Juvenile Justice Act of 2015 came into force on Friday, lowering the culpable age of a juvenile. Such accused can now be tried as adults for heinous crimes.

The act – lowering culpable age from 18 years to 16 years – was passed in the winter session by the Rajya Sabha and received presidential assent on December 31, 2015. It repeals the Juvenile Justice Act, 2000.


Under Section 15 of the new law, special provisions have been made to tackle child offenders in the age group of 16-18 years who commit heinous crimes, a Ministry of Women and Child development release said.

The Juvenile Justice Board is given the option to transfer cases of heinous offences by such children to a children’s court (court of sessions) after conducting preliminary assessment.

The act provides for placing such offender children in a ‘place of safety’ both during and after the trial till they attain the age of 21, after which his/her evaluation shall be conducted by the children’s court.

After the evaluation, the child is either released on probation and if not reformed, he/she will be sent to a jail for the remaining term.

Some other key provisions include new definitions such as orphaned, abandoned and surrendered children; petty, serious and heinous offences committed by children; clarity in powers, function and responsibilities of the Juvenile Justice Board and Child Welfare Committee.

For streamlined and more effective adoption procedures for orphaned, abandoned and surrendered children, the existing Central Adoption Resource Authority has been given statutory body status.

Several rehabilitation and social reintegration measures have been provided for children in conflict with law.

Several new offences committed against children are incorporated in the new law, including sale and procurement of children for any purpose like illegal adoption, corporal punishment in child care institutions, use of children by militant groups, offences against disabled children and kidnapping and abduction of children.

All child care institutions, whether run by the state government or voluntary or non-governmental organisations, are to be registered under the new legislation within six months from the date of commencement. Stringent penalty is provided in case of non-compliance. (IANS)


Popular

wikimedia commons

Acupuncture being performed by an oreintal medicine practitioner

Along with Chinese Traditional Medicine, acupuncture emerged in Asia as a technique to cure people of their disease simply by inserting needles at certain points, where the disease is said to lie.

The practice of acupuncture is believed to have a shamanistic origin. Shamans are those who profess to commune with spirits, ghosts, and the dead. They believed that people were cursed for any number of reasons, and this curse manifested in the form of physical symptoms. All diseases were simply versions of the curse, and when the patient was injected or subjected to moxibustion, which is the burning of particular herbs at various points of the body, the curse left.

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia commons

Mortgage loan graph

By- Blogger Indifi

EMI is known as equated monthly installments. It is a fixed payment made by the borrower each month to repay the loan amount. The EMI is divided into two loan components. One is the principal amount, and the second is the interest amount. Whether you are applying for a personal loan, business loan, home loan, car loan, or education loan, EMIs are easy to calculate using the EMI loan calculator.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Flickr.

Swastika, one of the sacred symbols used by many religions like Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism.

The symbol of Swastika is known to signify peace, prosperity, and good fortune in the religious cultures of Eurasia. In fact, this symbol is considered very significant in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. But, at the same time, it has become one of the most misunderstood religious symbols and has been globally banned in many countries.

The reason why the symbol of Swastika is banned in many countries is because of its association with Adolf Hitler's extreme political ideology, Nazism, as Swastika as its official symbol.

Keep reading... Show less