Monday August 20, 2018

Kerala to host South Asia’s largest film market

0
//
48
Republish
Reprint

KeralaKochi, the commercial capital of Kerala, will host the Indywood Film Market (IFM) and All Lights India International Film Festival (ALIIFF) 2015 from November 15 to 21.

ALIIFF 2015 is a unique platform for the global film industry to showcase excellence in film-making and to interact with artistes and technicians of world cinema.

This event will also be a platform for what is being touted as South Asia’s largest film market called Indywood Film Market, that will facilitate production and distribution deals of international films for the Indian market and sales of Indian cinema in the foreign market.

The event is organised by All Lights Film Services, a leading film services organisation promoted by All Lights Film Magazine. Sohan Roy, who directed “DAM 999”, is the founder-director of ALIIFF and IFM. “ALIIFF 2015 will have leading artistes and technicians of international repute attending the festival. The Indywood Film Market offers a wide opportunity for filmmakers and sponsors to become a part of South Asia’s biggest film souk where sales and promotions of international and Indian cinema will be made simple,” said Roy.

Film submission to ALIIFF has already begun and will remain open for different categories of films from around the globe until September 30 at www.aliiff.com. Short films, documentaries as well as features will be accepted as entries. Golden Leaf Awards will be presented to winners in the various categories.

– (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

‘A Fantastic Woman’ Could Have Been Paramount in Portraying a Transgender Woman’s Struggle

"A Fantastic Woman" fails to carry us along in its protagonist's tough journey from bereavement to isolation to confrontation to settlement. Marina can't wait to get out of it.

0
Daniella Vega
'A fantastic Women' seems stretched out. Flickr

Film: “A Fantastic Woman” (Spanish, with English Subtitles, based on a transgender woman); Director: Sebastian Lelio; Starring: Daniela Vega; Rating: 1/2 (2 and a half stars)

“A Fantastic Woman” could have been penetrating portrait of a transgender woman’s struggle for dignity after her middle-aged lover suddenly dies on her.

Marina (played with consummate sensitivity by Daniela Vega) never quite recovers from the traumatic shock. Neither does the film. It quickly goes downhill from the point of tragedy, building what looks like a shell-shocked narrative in-sync with the stupor that falls over Daniela’s soul after Orlando (Francisco Reyes) passes away.

The ensuing trauma of a ‘woman’ who is unacceptable to society for her gender and status in the life of the man she loved, is brought out like a dentist extracting rotten teeth. It is a graceless situation.And director Sebastian Lelio goes with the frown, rendering every crease in Daniela’s disheveled existence in shades of black and fright.

Daniela Vega
Spanish makes the dialogue-heavy sequences, makes it seem unnecessarily stretched-out and verbose. Flickr

Daniela’s dilemma is so in-your-face, it hardly needed to be affirmed so strongly by the narrative. Her humiliation is shown in scenes in the hospital and at the police station. And we know what happens to the mistress specially when she is gender-challenged. But Marina’s behaviour post the tragedy eschews empathy. She frets, fumes, snarls and at one point even jumps on to the car of her deceased lover’s family to bounce up and down.

By this point the edgy narrative begins to look uneasily unfocused.

Perhaps Marina’s unconventional methods of protest are a cultural things. Maybe in Chile, the conventions of bereavement are played out at a pitch that seems fairly bizarre to us. Also, the fact that the film is in Spanish makes the dialogue-heavy sequences, such as the one where Marina is confronted by Orlando’s wife in a car basement, seems unnecessarily stretched-out and verbose.

Also Read: Eating diorder can be treated in transgenders

“A Fantastic Woman” fails to carry us along in its protagonist’s tough journey from bereavement to isolation to confrontation to settlement. Marina can’t wait to get out of it.

Neither can we. (IANS)

Next Story