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Khan Academy offers math lessons in Hindi, other Indian languages on radar

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New Delhi: Khan Academy, a US-based non-profit organisation and an e-learning website that revolutionized the way schoolchildren learn math and science in that country, have entered India by launching Khan Academy Hindi starting with lessons in various grades of NCERT recommended Maths curriculum.

Khan acdeamy, whose free video tutorials were used by many, including Microsoft Corp. founder Bill Gates, is promoted by Salman Khan, a former hedge fund analyst in the US. According to reports, the platform will keep adding more videos, practice exercises and tutorials in Hindi for free.

The academy is currently in the process of translating the English lessons in Hindi.

“Math is something which easily translates—so we saw a good opportunity to leverage the English platform. Then, Hindi makes more sense as it caters to almost half a billion people. Khan Academy videos are used as a supplementary tool often, but it’s in a way the core as it offers complete education solutions,” Salman Khan told Live Mint.

Khan, who origionally hails from bengal, said the academy was also looking at translating its lessons to other Indian languages like Bangla, Kannada, Marathi, Oriya, Sinhala, Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu and Urdu.

“Bengali is close to my heart. Of course we are looking at other languages. We are going to focus on all major languages. What we are trying to do in India is about a whole different scale effort,” he said.

(Image courtesy: Khan Academy)

 

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)