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Kids as young as 12 are going to Universities in Canada and US

Unlike other students, these pre-teen students are entering universities in USA, Canada at a young age

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Jeremy Shuler, 12, a freshman at Cornell University, walks to meet an adviser on campus in Ithaca, New York, Aug. 26, 2016. He’s the youngest student on record to attend the Ivy League school. Source: VOA
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  • Growing number of pre-teen students are taking up university studies in US, Canada
  • Young students advance to top universities by learning languages, subjects in early age
  • Michael Kearney, born in 1984, holds the title of being youngest to graduate at eight years of age

Sept 07, 2016: Like other 12-year-olds, Cendikiawa n (Diki) Suryaatmadja is getting ready for a new school year.

But unlike other 12-year-olds, Diki will study physics and take additional classes in math, chemistry, and economics at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada.

He is one of a growing number of youngsters enrolling in universities.

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“I’m very excited to meet the new students and make new friends,” said the pre-teen in an interview with CBC News.

https://twitter.com/ScotForLiberty/status/773127539967614976

Diki, who is from West Java, a province in Indonesia, will be living with his father in an apartment near the university. The boy taught himself English in about six months by living in Singapore, reading English articles and watching subtitled English movies — especially comedies.

“Little by little, through osmosis, you can learn [a] language,” he told CBC.

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South of the border, Cornell University in New York also welcomed 12-year-old first-year student Jeremy Shuler this week.

American Michael Kearney, born in 1984, remains the youngest ever to have graduated with a college degree, at age eight. He went on to teach college while still a teenager. (VOA)

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Best time to learn new skills may develop during teenage years

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Teenage years are the best time to learn and develop new skills.
Teenage years are the best time to learn and develop new skills. wikimedia commons

London, Dec 24, 2017: While a person can never be old enough to learn a new skill, teenage years can make learning easier. It is because the brain reacts more responsively to receiving rewards during adolescence, finds a study. Teenage years have been known to be inextricably linked to alcohol abuse, reckless behaviour and poor choice in friends.

This is due in part to increased activity in the corpus striatum — a small area deeply hidden away inside the brain. However, the new study showed that this increased activity in the corpus striatum does not have only negative consequences. “The adolescent brain is very sensitive to feedback,” said Sabine Peters, Assistant Professor at the Leiden University in the Netherlands.

“That makes adolescence the ideal time to acquire and retain new information,” Peters added. For the study, published in Nature Communications, the team involved 300 subjects between the ages of 8 and 29 and took MRI scans of their brains, for over a period of five years.

In the MRI scanner, participants had to solve a memory game, while the researchers gave feedback on the participants’ performance. The results showed that adolescents responded keenly to educational feedback. If the adolescent received useful feedback, then you saw the corpus striatum being activated. This was not the case with less pertinent feedback, for example, if the test person already knew the answer, the researchers said.

“The stronger your brain recognises that difference, the better the performance in the learning task. Brain activation could even predict learning performance two years into the future,” Peters said. (IANS)

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