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Kids as young as 12 are going to Universities in Canada and US

Unlike other students, these pre-teen students are entering universities in USA, Canada at a young age

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Jeremy Shuler, 12, a freshman at Cornell University, walks to meet an adviser on campus in Ithaca, New York, Aug. 26, 2016. He’s the youngest student on record to attend the Ivy League school. Source: VOA
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  • Growing number of pre-teen students are taking up university studies in US, Canada
  • Young students advance to top universities by learning languages, subjects in early age
  • Michael Kearney, born in 1984, holds the title of being youngest to graduate at eight years of age

Sept 07, 2016: Like other 12-year-olds, Cendikiawa n (Diki) Suryaatmadja is getting ready for a new school year.

But unlike other 12-year-olds, Diki will study physics and take additional classes in math, chemistry, and economics at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada.

He is one of a growing number of youngsters enrolling in universities.

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“I’m very excited to meet the new students and make new friends,” said the pre-teen in an interview with CBC News.

https://twitter.com/ScotForLiberty/status/773127539967614976

Diki, who is from West Java, a province in Indonesia, will be living with his father in an apartment near the university. The boy taught himself English in about six months by living in Singapore, reading English articles and watching subtitled English movies — especially comedies.

“Little by little, through osmosis, you can learn [a] language,” he told CBC.

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South of the border, Cornell University in New York also welcomed 12-year-old first-year student Jeremy Shuler this week.

American Michael Kearney, born in 1984, remains the youngest ever to have graduated with a college degree, at age eight. He went on to teach college while still a teenager. (VOA)

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Google Gave Notice of it’s First Private Transatlantic Subsea Cable Project

Google picked undersea communications technology firm TE SubCom to design, manufacture and lay the cable for Dunant

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Google earlier became the first major non-telecom company to build a private intercontinental cable with its investment in the Curie cable. Pixabay

 In line with its global Cloud infrastructure expansion plans, Google has revealed its first private transAtlantic subsea cable project designed to bring high-bandwidth, low-latency and highly secure Cloud connections between the US and Europe.

Named Dunant, after Henri Dunant, the first Nobel Peace Prize winner and founder of the Red Cross, the cable is expected to become available in late 2020, Google’s Strategic Negotiator Jayne Stowell wrote in a blog post on Tuesday.

Google picked undersea communications technology firm TE SubCom to design, manufacture and lay the cable for Dunant.

“This cable crosses the Atlantic Ocean from Virginia Beach in the US to the French Atlantic coast, and will expand our network – already the world’s largest — to help us better serve our users and customers,” Stowell said.

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Google unveils first private subsea cable project. Pixabay

Google earlier became the first major non-telecom company to build a private intercontinental cable with its investment in the Curie cable.

“Cables are often built to serve a very specific route. When we build privately, we can choose this route based on what will provide the lowest latency for the largest segment of customers,” Stowell said while offering the rationale behind the decision to build Dunant privately.

Also Read-Google Rolls out ‘Morse Code’ Support on Gboard for iOS

“In this case, we wanted connectivity across the Atlantic that was close to certain data centres, but the reasons could also include the ability to land in certain countries, or to connect two places that were previously underserved, such as was the case with Curie,” Stowell added.

Google also took into consideration factors such as capacity and bandwidth for the decision. (IANS)