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Killing of Indian Fisherman allegedly by the Sri Lankan Navy raised in Lok Sabha

Raising the issue in the lower house, AIADMK leader M. Thambidurai said the fishermen community was in "shock" over the killing

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A fisherman in India (representational image), Wikimedia

New Delhi, March 9, 2017: Members in the Lok Sabha on Thursday raised the issue of the killing of an Indian fisherman allegedly by the Sri Lankan Navy, and sought action from the government.

Raising the issue in the lower house, AIADMK leader M. Thambidurai said the fishermen community was in “shock” over the killing.

He also said that Indian fishermen are regularly troubled by the Sri Lankan Navy who at times also take away their fishing equipment.

The AIADMK member also urged the central government to resolve the issue around the Katchatheevu island, which was ceded to Sri Lanka.

Congress MP Shashi Tharoor said urgent action needed to be taken for the fishermen community who are losing their livelihood as the fish catch close to the shore was depleted, and the fishermen are forced to go into deep waters.

Tharoor said that Indian fishermen were also being arrested by Pakistan’s Navy and recently, Indian fishermen were taken in custody in the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT) of Diego Garcia, an archipelago of 55 islands in the Indian Ocean south of India.

“Fish stock near the shore has depleted, so fishermen go into deep waters. Modernisation of fishing infrastructure is urgently required,” he said.

Six fishermen from Thangachimadam in Ramanathapuram district were fishing near the Katchatheevu islet in the narrow sea dividing the two countries when they were fired at on Monday night, Indian officials said.

One fisherman, K. Britjo, was killed. Another who was injured was warded in a hospital in Tamil Nadu. The others escaped without injuries.

Colombo has denied that the Sri Lankan Navy was involved in the killing and promised a thorough probe in the incident. (IANS)

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Over 7,000 New Marine Species Discovered from Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Ocean

The new species, also included acidobacteria -- a natural medicinal phylum with the CRISPR gene editing system -- raising hope for the development of new drugs

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marine species
The new species, also included acidobacteria -- a natural medicinal phylum with the CRISPR gene editing system -- raising hope for the development of new drugs. Pixabay

Over 7,000 new marine species have been discovered from the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans, shedding new light on understanding of microbial biodiversity in the seas.

The team from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), discovered over 7,000 new biofilm-forming species and 10 new bacterial phyla, breaking the existing belief that the world has only 35,000 marine microbial species and 80 bacterial phyla, Xinhua news agency reported.

The new species, also included acidobacteria — a natural medicinal phylum with the CRISPR gene editing system — raising hope for the development of new drugs.

marine species
It is the first ocean species found to contain the gene-editing system CRISPR, and offers resistance to foreign plasmids or phages and contains gene-editing capabilities, the report said. Pixabay

“The discovery of new marine microbial species has not only improved our understanding of ocean biodiversity, but more importantly, these species have big potential, both in terms of facilitating our understanding of lives and offering new clues to our search of new treatments for diseases,” said lead author Qian Peiyuan, Professor of the Department of Ocean Science at HKUST.

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Acidobacteria, previously known to exist in terrestrial soils, has been used for developing novel antibiotics and anti-tumour drugs due to its high level of biosynthetic gene clusters.

It is the first ocean species found to contain the gene-editing system CRISPR, and offers resistance to foreign plasmids or phages and contains gene-editing capabilities, the report said.

For the study, published in the scientific journal Nature Communications, the team sourced water samples across the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. (IANS)