Wednesday April 25, 2018

Knee pain can trigger depression in elderly

"Examining elderly people's responses to questions about pain at night and difficulties performing daily activities may be an efficient way of identifying those at high risk of developing depressive symptoms," the researchers said

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Knee Joint. Pixabay.
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  • Knee pain in elderly is very common
  • However, it can also cause depression in some of them
  • Knee pain from osteoarthritis can make it hard for them to take care of themselves

Knee pain in the elderly, which can damage the quality of life, can make them prone to depression, researchers say. Osteoarthritis occurs when a joint becomes inflamed, usually because the protective cartilage and other tissues that cushion joints like the knee become damaged and worn over time.

Osteoarthritis can make life difficult for older people. VOA

Knee pain from The study, led by Yuji Nishiwaki from the Toho University in Japan, showed that elderly who experienced knee pain at night while in bed, while putting on socks, or while getting in or out of a car were more likely to report having symptoms of depression.

The team examined 573 people aged 65 or older for the study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. When the study began (between 2005 and 2006) none of the participants had symptoms of depression.

Two years later, nearly all of them completed follow-up interviews. The participants answered questions about their knee pain and were evaluated for symptoms of depression. Nearly 12 per cent of the participants had developed symptoms of depression.

Another recently published study showed that both knee pain and functional impairments in elderly individuals are associated with the development of depressive symptoms.

Also Read: Treatment for lower back pain poor, harmful globally: Lancet

“Examining elderly people’s responses to questions about pain at night and difficulties performing daily activities may be an efficient way of identifying those at high risk of developing depressive symptoms,” the researchers said. IANS

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Drinking water boosts mental skills in exercising elders

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Water fasting can be harmful Wikimedia commons
Water fasting can be harmful Wikimedia commons

Older people who indulge in physical activity should increase their amount of water intake, to reap the full cognitive benefits of exercise, researchers suggest.

Dehydration has been shown to impair exercise performance and brain function in young people, but less is known about its impact on older populations.

The findings showed that hydration boosts performance on test of executive function that includes the skills needed to plan, focus, remember and multitask following exercise. Exercise has been shown to improve intellectual health, including executive function.

An elderly woman exercising.
Exercising elderly can drink water to boost their mind.

“Middle-age and older adults often display a blunted thirst perception, which places them at risk for dehydration and subsequently may reduce the cognitive health-related benefits of exercise,” said researchers including Brandon Yates, of Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, US.

The study, presented at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego, explored the association between hydration status before exercising and exercise-enhanced cognition in older adults.  The team recruited recreational cyclists (average age 55) who participated in a large cycling event on a warm day (78-86 degrees F).

Also Read: Knee pain can trigger depression in elderly

The cyclists performed a “trail-making” executive function test–quickly and accurately connecting numbered dots using paper and pencil — before and after the event.

The team tested the volunteers’ urine before they exercised and divided them into two groups — normal hydration and dehydrated — based on their hydration status.

Drinking water boosts mental skills in exercising elderly.
Drinking water boosts mental skills in exercising elderly. Pixabay

The normal hydration group showed noticeable improvement in the completion time of the trail-making test after cycling when compared to their pre-cycling test. The dehydration group also completed their post-cycling test more quickly, but the time reduction was not significant.

“This suggests that older adults should adopt adequate drinking behaviours to reduce cognitive fatigue and potentially enhance the cognitive benefits of regular exercise participation,” the researchers said. IANS

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