Wednesday October 16, 2019
Home Lead Story Know How Ohio...

Know How Ohio Teenager Defined His Anti-Vaccine Mother, Believing It Caused Autism

Lindenberger first made headlines late last year when he posted a message on social media saying "My parents think vaccines are some kind of government scheme ... God knows how I'm still alive," and asked for guidance on how to protect himself.

0
//
Lindenberger
Ethan Lindenberger testifies during a Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines, focusing on preventable disease outbreaks. VOA

An Ohio teenager who defied his anti-vaccine mother and received shots against several dangerous diseases was the star witness at a Senate hearing Tuesday.

Eighteen-year-old Ethan Lindenberger said he did his own research and concluded his mother is wrong in believing vaccines are unsafe and cause autism.

Sarah Myriam of New Jersey holds her daughter Aliyah, 2, as they join activists opposed to vaccinations outside a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019.
Sarah Myriam of New Jersey holds her daughter Aliyah, 2, as they join activists opposed to vaccinations outside a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019. VOA

Lindenberger said his mother’s “love, affection and care are apparent” but said his school in Norwalk, Ohio, saw him as a “health threat” because of the danger he could become sick with a contagious disease.

He testified that his own research convinced him vaccines are safe, but still failed to convince his mother.

Without her approval, Lindenberger got himself inoculated against hepatitis, influenza, tetanus, human papillomavirus, polio, and measles, mumps and rubella.

He said his mother still turns to what he calls “illegitimate sources that instill fear into the public.”

Ethan Lindenberger shakes hands with Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., right, before the start of a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines.
Ethan Lindenberger shakes hands with Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee chairman, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., right, before the start of a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, March 5, 2019, to examine vaccines. VOA

Lindenberger first made headlines late last year when he posted a message on social media saying “My parents think vaccines are some kind of government scheme … God knows how I’m still alive,” and asked for guidance on how to protect himself.

Also Read: TikTok Addicted India Before Elections

He said thousands of other kids posted similar statements and said he wants youngsters to know that they do not always need their parents’ permission to get vaccinated.

Tuesday’s Senate hearing on vaccines was called, in part, to address an outbreak of measles.

There are 200 known cases in 11 states so far this year with the Pacific Northwest hardest hit. (VOA)

Next Story

Uber Joins Hands with DocsApp to Avail Free Medical Consultations for its Drivers

Additionally, the drivers will be sent a pre-recorded message to help them avail the services, and they will have a separate customer support number for this

0
Uber, bengaluru
Photo shows an exterior view of the headquarters of Uber in San Francisco. (VOA)

Cab aggregator Uber on Tuesday partnered DocsApp to avail free medical consultations, subsidised prescription medicines along with lab tests for its driver and delivery partners across Uber rides and Uber Eats platforms.

“We are delighted to announce our partnership with DocsApp which aims to enhance the quality of life of our driver-partners, and their families, by providing them with increased access to medical consultations. Backed with this partnership, we believe our driver-partners will be better equipped to deliver their best when driving on our platform,” Pavan Vaish, Head of Central Operations (Rides), India SA Uber said in a statement.

Under the partnership, the driver and delivery partners will be able to get medical assistance at a nominal cost for themselves and up to 5 family members.

uber eats
Delivery men working with the food delivery apps Uber Eats and Swiggy wait to pick up an order outside a restaurant in Mumbai, India, Feb. 6, 2019. VOA

Through this partnership, they can get access to free unlimited consultations from doctors on call, along with up to 20 per cent discount on medicines and up to 40 per cent discount on lab tests anywhere in India.

Also Read: Flipkart Takes on Amazon Prime with the Launch of ‘Flipkart Video Originals’

Over 50,000 Uber India driver-partners have already registered on the online doctor consultation platform.

Additionally, the drivers will be sent a pre-recorded message to help them avail the services, and they will have a separate customer support number for this. (IANS)