Sunday May 27, 2018

Kshama: The importance of forgiveness in life

0
//
363
Republish
Reprint

By Nithin Sridhar

Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures – Part 9

The previous installment of the series dealt with how daya/compassion and love should be shown towards everyone. Another tenet of dharma (duty/righteousness) that is intimately connected to compassion is “kshama” or forgiveness.

Picture credit: thecounselingmarriagefamily.com
Picture credit: thecounselingmarriagefamily.com

Forgiving is generally understood as forgiving someone for some action that may have offended us. At times, this forgiveness may have been imposed on us due to various factors. The general understanding of forgiveness is that one gives up any grudges that he/she holds against another person. And even this may not always be the case.

A person may not truly give up grudges against another, even after he or she might have rendered forgiveness. Often, the grudges and the frustrations stay as bitter memories in the subconscious mind.

As a result, many people are prone to anger, insecurity, hatred, and other such negative emotions. This in turn prevents them practice compassion towards everyone. Therefore, it becomes crucial to understand what forgiveness means and how to practice it. Shandilya Upanishad (1.1) says:

kshamA nAma priyApriyEshu sarvEshu tADanapUjayEShu sahanam!

BuddhaShakyamuni

Translation: The forbearance of pleasant and the unpleasant, the praise as well as the abuse is termed as “Kshama”
Therefore, Kshama is just not just about forgiving someone for their mistakes or offenses. It is about handling the good and the bad, the sorrow and the happiness in a patient and self-restrained manner.

The human nature is such that, people love getting praised. They always look forward to get appreciated by others. It may be a student looking for the teacher’s appreciation, or an employee expecting good words from his boss. The same is the case with a wife expecting a compliment about her beauty from her husband.

On the other hand, people cannot tolerate even mild criticism. People’s anger will burst out if anybody criticizes them openly. An insult or verbal abuse may lead to a physical fight as well.

The fact of the matter is, people find it hard to control their own thoughts and emotions. A famous quote attributed to Buddha says it is better to conquer yourself than to win a thousand wars. And the key to conquer one’s own mind is in practicing Kshama.

The happy memories linger in the mind for a shorter duration compared to bitter memories that can linger for years and years. Kshama means removing those bitter memories from their very roots.

This uprooting of grudges even from the sub-conscious level is truly possible, when one realizes that the happiness or sorrow, the praise or the insult one faces in life are nothing but fruits of one’s own past actions- actions that were committed over many lives.

Therefore, there is no meaning in blaming other’s for one’s own fall and suffering. Hence, one should forgive the other person for his faults. One should forgive even those who try to harm us.

Kshama is the key to unburden the mind from the burdens like frustration, hate, anger, and enmity. Let Kshama not be misunderstood as a sign of weakness, instead it is a sign of strength.

Once, a person realizes that he or she is the master of his/her own destiny, the person will stop getting affected by what others say or do. The praise or criticism will cease to be a burden on the mind. Instead, such a person will take criticism constructively and act upon it if he finds any merit in it.

Further, forgiving someone does not mean turning a blind eye towards his actions or pacifism. Instead, only a person endowed with Kshama can truly act in a righteous and dharmic manner. Therefore, the practice of Kshama is very vital for practicing dharma and the key to this practice is development of equal-sightedness- perceiving every person and their actions on the basis of merit and not prejudice; and not letting any of those affect the mind or the decisions.

More in this segment:
Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 1
Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 2
Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 3
Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 4
Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 5
Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 6

Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 7

Gleanings from Hindu Scriptures- Part 8

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Arrest Of ISIS-Inspired Texas Teen A Reminder For Temples To Review Security Plans 

The Department of Homeland Security’s Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Houses of Worship offers invaluable information for temples to start implementing a plan, if they do not already have one in place.

0
//
44
The Hindu American Foundation (HAF) is a non-partisan advocacy organization for the Hindu American community.
Flag of Islamic State, Wikimedia commons

Yesterday a Plano, Texas teenager was arrested after he revealed his plot to carry out a mass shooting, in what is being reported as an ISIS-inspired attack. Among the targets reportedly considered by the suspect, were a school, local Hindu temple, and shopping mall. The latter was ultimately the chosen target.

Dr. Rajiv Pandit, HAF Board Member and local Dallas community leader, offered the following statement:

“The Hindu American Foundation thanks both local and Federal law enforcement officials for their diligence and work on this case. We’re grateful the suspect was caught in time, saving innumerable lives. While it has not been made public which Hindu temple was a potential target — there are over twenty in the area — the Foundation urges all houses of worship to use this incident as a reminder and opportunity to review their existing emergency operations plan.”

The Hindu American Foundation thanks both local and Federal law enforcement officials for their diligence and work on this case.
London Bridge Attack by IS, wikimedia commons

The Department of Homeland Security’s Guide for Developing High-Quality Emergency Operations Plans for Houses of Worship offers invaluable information for temples to start implementing a plan, if they do not already have one in place.

ABOUT HAF

The Hindu American Foundation (HAF) is a non-partisan advocacy organization for the Hindu American community. The Foundation educates the public about Hinduism, speaks out about issues affecting Hindus worldwide, and builds bridges with institutions and individuals whose work aligns with HAF’s objectives. HAF focuses on human and civil rights, public policy, media, academia, and interfaith relations. Through its advocacy efforts, HAF seeks to cultivate leaders and empower future generations of Hindu Americans.

Also Read: Analysts Hopeless Over the Trade Talks Between the U.S. and Chinese Government

The Hindu American Foundation is not affiliated with any religious or political organizations or entities. HAF seeks to serve Hindu Americans across all sampradayas (Hindu religious traditions) regardless of race, color, national origin, citizenship, caste, gender, sexual orientation, age and/or disability.