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5G- The Latest Network Soon To Be Launched By Huawei

Huawei to launch end-to-end 5G solution later this year

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5G Technology.

At a time when big enterprises globally are looking to create a robust 5G ecosystem for the commercial roll-out of the technology, Huawei on Tuesday said the company will launch an end-to-end 5G solution by the second half of this year.

According to Huawei’s Rotating Chairman Eric Xu, the company is committed to investing in 5G.

“We are fully committed to 5G investment and by the second half of this year, we’re going to launch an end-to-end 5G solution,” Huawei’s rotating Chairman Eric Xu said here on Tuesday.

The logo of Huawei
Huawei

Speaking during his keynote at the 2018 edition of the Huawei Analyst Summit (HAS), Xu said 5G will result in faster speed and decrease networking costs.

“5G is just another product line at Huawei. It is a natural evolution of the technology — from 2G to 3G to 4G and now 5G,” Xu told the gathering.

According to Xu, there is no fundamental difference between 4G and 5G and for the consumers, it is all about faster speed. “We don’t have other material differences in experiences for the consumer between the two technologies,” he said.

The executive said that 4G infrastructure today is robust and the 5G technology will first be targeted at dense areas to meet growing demand from the consumers for more bandwidth.

When asked about the US restricting access to China-made smartphones and telecoms infrastructure owing to security concerns, Xu refused to comment directly but said Huawei’s position in the US market has not changed.

“We’re focused on what we can do and provide better services to our customers,’ Xu said.

According to him, Artificial Intelligence (AI) will help the telecom industry worldwide to improve networks.

Also Read: Huawei And Airtel Conduct Successful 5G Trial In India

In February, Huawei and telecom services provider Bharti Airtel announced to have successfully conducted 5G network trial under a test set-up in India.

The trial was conducted at Airtel’s Network Experience Centre in Manesar (Gurugram). During the test trial, a user throughput of more than 3Gbps was achieved.

This is the highest measured throughput for a mobile network in 3.5 GHz band with 100MHz bandwidth and end-to-end network latency of approximately 1 msec, the company said.

“We have been focusing on developing 5G ecosystem and use cases and the show with Bharti Airtel impressively demonstrates the performance capability of 5G in 3.5 GHz band,” said Emmanuel Coelho Alves, Director, Wireless Marketing, Huawei HQ.

Latest technology of 5G by Huawei
Huawei’s 5G technology

The company, which began investing in 5G research in 2009, is aiming to invest $600 million in the 5G technology by end of this year.

“The 5G era is approaching, and we are confident that 5G deployment in India will happen in line with global timeline,” Jay Chen, CEO, Huawei India, told IANS recently.

Also Read: Huawei to showcase world’s 1st smartphone-driven car

Huawei in September last year released its 5G-oriented mobile bearer solution ‘X-Haul’ for operators in India to build end-to-end 5G networks.  IANS

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China’s Race to 5G Raises National Security Implications Between US and China

When standards are created, controlled, and sold by other countries, there is enhanced pressure on the U.S. to adopt those standards, which would have significant economic and national security costs

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FILE - A woman stands at a Huawei booth featuring 5G technology at the PT Expo in Beijing, China, Sept. 28, 2018. VOA

Michael R. Wessel is a commissioner of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, a U.S. government organization that investigates the national security implications of trade and economic relationship between the U.S. and China.

He recently discussed with VOA his concerns about China’s race to 5G, the next generation of wireless connectivity being built worldwide. With a 5G network, users will be able to send and receive more data in less time, which could have implications for self-driving cars, smart cities and other technologies.

Q: How much does it matter which country is first to fully functioning 5G?

Wessel:
 It does matter. First mover advantage is crucial in any new technology, but it is particularly important in 5G because it is foundational for cutting-edge innovation and applications including smart cities, network manufacturing, and integrated warfighting capability.

When standards are created, controlled, and sold by other countries, there is enhanced pressure on the U.S. to adopt those standards, which would have significant economic and national security costs.

For example, U.S. 4G leadership contributed to around $125 billion in U.S. company revenue from abroad and more than $40 billion in U.S. application and content developer revenue, and created 2.1 million new jobs from 2011-2014. And, from a national security perspective, the “control” of technologies raises unacceptable risks.

china, 5G
FILE – A banner of the 5G network is displayed during the Mobile World Congress wireless show, in Barcelona, Spain, Feb. 25, 2019. VOA

Q: How far ahead is Huawei or China on 5G?

Wessel: China’s leadership in 5G depends on how we define competition. Some U.S. companies are already offering 5G devices and are running pilot projects in select cities, so they have beat China to the punch. However, Chinese investment into 5G is vast.

As of early February 2019, Huawei owned 1,529 “standard-essential” 5G patents, the most of any company, according to data-analytics firm IPlytics. By comparison, Qualcomm, a U.S. company, owned 787 standard-essential patents. All Chinese companies together own 36 percent of all 5G standard-essential patents, while U.S. companies (Intel and Qualcomm) own 14 percent.

In terms of 5G network build out, China is also racing ahead: China Tower, a monopoly created by the Chinese government to build the country’s 5G infrastructure, said it would likely cover the country by 2023. One estimate said China Tower built more sites in 3 months than U.S. did in 3 years. In the United States, the process is likely to take much longer, with each company handling its own networks, and will need to negotiate with local governments for tower locations.

Q: The U.S. is urging its allies to not work with Huawei in building their 5G networks out of concern that the Chinese technology giant could give the Chinese government access to the new network for spying. Some countries such as Germany say they won’t rule out working with Huawei. Why is this a problem for the U.S.?

Huawei
A staff member stands in front of a Huawei shop in Beijing, China, March 7, 2019. VOA

Wessel: We tend to focus on the economic cost and not consider the national securiy cost of something as significant as a nationwide 5G network rollout.

ALSO READ: British Airways to Launch its Shortest Flight with only 40 Minutes Spent in Air

Huawei products, services and activities have already raised significant concerns and our allies have to consider how much more investment they are willing to make into their technology.

No amount of risk mitigation or false attempts at transparency are adequate. The problem is Germany and other allies have already incorporated some Huawei equipment into their tech infrastructure. Much like a virus, our allies can choose to inoculate themselves against this danger now, or run the risk of painful and costly treatment later. Unfortunately, this is a great risk to intelligence-sharing among allies and partners. (VOA)