Saturday December 16, 2017

Life beyond guns: Kashmiri women’s eternal love for Atta-Hor, Kana-Door, Jumaka, Deji-Hor

0
456

ShowImage

By Sunil Koul

The valley of Kashmir in addition to its natural and beautiful munificence has been narrated abundantly by its poets and singers finding its place as a happy amalgamation of various attitudes, ways of life and culture. The assimilative propensities of the land and the people have evolved towards a unique philosophy of life in which the ever-rejuvenating sterling rudiments of every faith have not only found their due place but also prominence. Kashmir is not only known as a ‘Paradise on Earth’ but also a heaven of human values taken as a distinction recognised throughout the globe despite practising different faiths and values. The essence of Kashmir is defined by its rich culture and its warm people.  It is equally known for the magnificent ornaments and dresses worn by its people. Ornaments in the valley are not worn for their intrinsic value and beauty alone but for religious reasons as well. The beautiful golden ornament worn by married Kashmiri Pandit women known as Dej-Hor is an important example.

Ornaments

Ornaments in Kashmir are generally made of gold but sometimes precious stones like Opals, Carbuncles, Sapphires, Turquoises and Agates are also studded in the formation and design to enhance the appeal. Though most of these gemstones are brought from outside the region, Emeralds, Sapphires, Agates and Amethyst are indigenous and found within the state of Jammu & Kashmir.

Kashmiri lapidaries are very skilful in their trade and need to be praised for the delicacy and details of their workmanship. The enchanting beauty of Kashmir finds expression in all its arts and crafts. The design on the ornaments are distinct and easily distinguishable from other parts of world.  Nature finds its place in the design of this miniature art form. Almonds, Chinar leaves and birds like Myna and Bulbul are prominent.

he goldsmith in Kashmir loves his work and works deep into the night to make the item a thing of beauty. Interestingly, the shape and form of most of the ornaments worn by Pandit and Muslim ladies are similar to a great extent. Some of the principal ornaments worn by Kashmiri women are given below:-

 Jiggni and Tikka are worn on forehead and generally are triangular, semi-circular and circular in shape. These are made of gold and silver and are fringed with hanging pearls and gold leaves.

The ornaments of ear namely Atta-HorKana-DoorJumakaDeji-Hor and Kana Vaji are studded with turquoise with a fringe of hanging gold leaves and balls. Kana-Vaji is also an ornament of ear studded with stones of different colours with a fringe of small pearls and Jumaka that is a ball shaped ear-ring.

As mentioned earlier, Deji-Hor is an indispensable ornament for married Kashmiri Pandit women who wear it all the time as a mark of wedlock also known as ‘Suhag’. Atta-Hor hangs over the ear of the Kashmiri Pandit married women on either side of the head and is connected by a golden chain running over the head. Kana-Door, another ornament of the ear is worn mostly by the young girls. These ornaments are made of gold and silver and are studded with red and green stones or pearls.

Heritage Kashmir Dresses

The traditional dress of Kashmir is renowned for its embroidery and intricate designs that reflect the rich of the culture and landscape of the region. The attire in Kashmir found similarities with that of Arabia, Persia and Turkistan. It is believed to have been introduced by Saiyed Ali Hamdani in the reign of Sultan Sikandar. The Kashmiri Pandits of the Kashmir Valley too had adopted it. The lower portion of the body was covered with wide trousers called Shalwaar of Persian origin while the upper portion had a shirt called Kamiz with full sleeves. Over this was a short vest coat which was called Sadri. The outer robe was called Chogha and descended to the ankles. It had long loose sleeves and round the waist was a girdle. The head-dress consisted of a small close-fitting cap covered with a cloth. This formed the turban. On festive occasions, silk was worn. Such a dress sense was prevalent among the rich and the wealthier sections of the society.

The dress for the poorer sections has not changed since the medieval times. Men put on a Skull-cap over their shaven heads and did not wear turbans. They cover their bodies with a long loose large-sleeved woollen garment called Pheran, open from neck to the waist and falling down to the ankles with a belt round the waist. The footwear consisted of shoes made of grass called Pulharoo. Some wore sandles made of wood called Khraw. The dress of women was almost the same as that of a man except that they had a fillet on their forehead and above it was a mantilla which fell from the head over the shoulders. The head dress of the Kashmiri women was calledKasaba. The Kashmir Pandit women too used Kasaba but they called it Taranga which was tied to the hanging bonnet, falling to the heels from behind.

Dresses in contemporary times

 The dress in Kashmir has presently changed altogether. Like many other cultures and societies, Kashmir too has adopted the modern western ways of living. In spite of this intrusion, the Pheran is still worn by all sections of the people especially in winters to get rid of the chill and hostile weather conditions in region. A Kashmiri usually feels delighted and always extracts pleasure by wearing the Pheran made up of a thick woollen fabric for winter and another one made up of cotton for the summer. This dress has now become popular among the non-residents as well. The Pheran is gaining immense popularity among the visiting tourists that usually buy this dress that has been seen finding its place even in many recent bollywood movies of our film industry.

A Kashmiri feels proud to associate himself with the unique legacy and identity of his land. Even the majority of the Kashmiri Pandits now putting up outside Kashmir in the other parts of the country have not forgotten to use their traditional dress. Most of them still wear the beautiful Kashmiri ornaments. One needs to keep the fact in mind that the cultural identities and the traditional values hardly die down. This stands true for one and all.

(Sunil Koul is a Media & Communications Officer, PIB Jammu)

Next Story

Sexual abuse is everywhere in the world, says Radhika

The actress believes that one should know how to say 'No'

0
121
Radhika Apte's view on sexual abuse
Bollywood actress Radhika Apte says that sexual abuse is not only in B-town but in every part of the society. Wikimedia Commons

– Durga Chakravarty

Actress Radhika Apte feels that sexual abuse does not only exist in the world of showbiz but takes place in every alternate household.

“Sexual abuse takes place in every alternate household. So it’s not a part of just the film industry. You have so much child abuse, domestic abuse everywhere in the world, including India,” Radhika told IANS over phone from Mumbai.

She says it exists in “every field and household at some level or the other and that it all needs to be eliminated”.

Sexual abuse does not target just women, stresses Radhika.

“It’s also towards men, little boys and everybody. People exploit their power at every level.”

Radhika asserted that this needed to change.

“I think it starts from us putting our foot down and saying ‘no’ to things, however big your ambition is. You need to be brave about it, believe in your own talent, say ‘no’ and start speaking up because if one person speaks up, nobody is going to listen to him or her. But if 10 people do, then others would (listen to them),” she said.

The “Phobia” actress, who will be seen mentoring budding filmmakers in MTV’s upcoming digital show “Fame-istan”, says there has to be a more organised platform for people to work.

“There has to be more professional platforms as well as rules in place which is slowly happening.”

Sexual abuse has been a topic of debate in Bollywood and Hollywood. Prominent names from the entertainment industry are discussing how men in power take advantage of women in exchange for taking forward their dreams.

The sexual harassment saga started when a media house published a story in October revealing numerous accusations of sexual abuse against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein.

But why are no names taken in the case of casting couch in Bollywood?

“Because of fear, because people who have great ambitions are afraid. They think of what will happen to them if they take somebody’s name who has so much power. That’s what I am saying. Everybody has to speak up,” she added.

Radhika ventured into Bollywood in 2005 with “Vaah! Life Ho Toh Aisi!” and since then has explored genres like thriller, drama and adult comedy with films like “Rakht Charitra”, “Shor in the City”, “Badlapur”, “Parched” and “Hunterrr”.

Was it a conscious decision to act less in commercial entertainers?

Radhika said: “Nothing like that. You have to choose from the work that you have. You can’t say that ‘I want that’ if that’s not been offered to you. So, whatever is offered to you, you choose from that. You make your choice whatever you feel is going to be more challenging or something that inspires you or excites you.”

She says she makes her choices in the “spur of the moment” with whatever she feels intuitively. “I am not a very big planner.” (IANS)

Next Story

Sridevi’s daughter Jhanvi Kapoor all set to debut in Bollywood

0
70
Daughter of Sridevi
Jhanvi Kapoor is the daughter of veteran actress Sridevi and Director Boney Kapoor

Radhika Bhirani

“Let me tell you, I feel like a newcomer,” Sridevi asserts, breaking into a giggle almost reminiscent from her ahead-of-times 1991 film “Lamhe”, even as she prepares to let her elder daughter loose in the Bollywood world. She says nothing comes easy in life, and she is sure her Jhanvi is ready to face the challenges.

Jhanvi, who is frequently followed by the paparazzi in Mumbai, will reportedly foray into films with a remake of Marathi hit “Sairat”.

Steering clear of divulging details about Jhanvi’s debut, Sridevi told IANS over phone from Mumbai: “She has chosen this path and profession, and I have been in this industry for long. So I am mentally more prepared than her. She has been watching me, and knows what she is getting into.”

“Nothing is going to be a cakewalk in any profession. So you have to work hard, and there will be challenges. I’m sure she is ready for it.”

The charismatic actress made a powerful comeback of sorts with “Mom” earlier this year — five years after her delightful plain Jane avatar in “English Vinglish”.

As “Mom”, which will soon release in Russia, nears its world television premiere on &Pictures on Saturday, Sridevi — who also has daughter Khushi — spoke about her worries as a parent.

“I’m of course worried when they go out, but luckily, they know their limits and they are very responsible children. When you have responsible children, half the battle is over. So, you don’t have to worry. But you are concerned. The concern will never go, and you’ll always be conscious about them,” said the 54-year-old.

Sridevi has been a big screen delight since her Bollywood debut with the 1978 movie “Solva Sawan”. But acting is something she started when she was all of four. In Hindi cinema, “Himmatwala”, “Mr. India”, “Chandni”, “Sadma”, “Nagina”, “ChaalBaaz”, “Lamhe” and “Khuda Gawah” are some of the films which established her footing as a performer who took woman power seriously.

The trait has continued with “English Vinglish” and “Mom” — in both of which she played the strong role of a mother effectively.

While most women actors in India complain about lack of roles for older actresses, Sridevi retorted: “Let me tell you, I feel that my career has just started, haan (giggles). I feel like a newcomer, and I feel that my career is going to start now. It’s not finished, it’s going to start now.”

She is also unlike many others — even much younger actors — who are putting their life story into books.

“Arre, maine kuch achieve nai kiya (I haven’t achieved anything), where I write about my story or my book. There’s a long way to go. There’s nothing, nothing like this,” she said, sounding almost ignorant, but humble, of the fan followers of her emotive power and fluid dancing skills.

At this point, she is just enthused to deliver more.

“There are definitely two films that are coming up, but it’s too early to talk about it. (There’s) Nothing I can say right now,” she said.

Over the years, Sridevi has not just embraced the changes in Indian cinema, but also opened up herself to an environment where celebrities — as opposed to her own shy self in her earlier days — need to go all out to promote her projects.

“Look, with the time, I have definitely opened up. I am definitely introvert and shy, and have never been rude to… I’ve definitely been shy, but thanks to my children, I have opened up. Somewhere, you have to change with the time.

“You can’t be like what you were… It doesn’t work that way. And do that (change) within your comfort, not by going out of it.”

That besides, she says a positive frame of mind, helps her look forward to what life has to offer.

“Be in a positive frame of mind, be happy, fulfil your goals, work hard… It never goes waste.”

Next Story

Manoj Bajpayee is an amazing actor and a team player on set: Sidharth Malhotra

Sidharth Malhotra on Thursday treated his fans to a question and answer session over Twitter.

0
44
Actor Sidharth Malhotra
Actor Sidharth Malhotra. Wikimedia Commons

November 7, 2017: Actor Sidharth Malhotra, who will be seen sharing screen space with Manoj Bajpayee in “Aiyaary”, says the National Award winning actor is amazing and a team player.

Sidharth Malhotra on Thursday treated his fans to a question and answer session over Twitter.

A user asked the “Student Of The Year” actor about his experience working with Manoj in “Aiyaary”.

Sidharth replied: “He’s an amazing actor and a team player on set.”

“Aiyaary”, set in Delhi, London and Kashmir, revolves around two strong-minded Army officers having completely different views, yet right in their own ways. It is a real-life story based on the relationship between a mentor and a protege.

Presented by Plan C and Jayantilal Gada (Pen), the project is produced by Shital Bhatia, Dhaval Jayantilal Gada, Motion Picture Capital.

When asked about the development of the film, Sidharth replied: “Awesome. Excited to show it in a few months.”

Sidharth, 32, also described his “Brothers” co-star Akshay Kumar as his “brother from another mother.”(IANS)