Shifting in with a stranger? Here's a guide for you

With people returning to their work cities, finding the ideal location and a suitable home, as well as a roommate, is critical to making this transition comfortable and easy.
It's not very likely that you and your roommate would have the same palate to decorate your home. (Pixabay)
It's not very likely that you and your roommate would have the same palate to decorate your home. (Pixabay)

With people returning to their work cities, finding the ideal location and a suitable home, as well as a roommate, is critical to making this transition comfortable and easy.

It is also important to note that interior design is just as important as architecture in making a house habitable.

It's not very likely that you and your roommate would have the same palate to decorate your home. What's more likely is that your tastes are mildly on par with each other's - and they may or may not be as crazy about the color as you are. When sharing a living space with someone, it is essential to incorporate the personalities of both to make the house in its true meaning, a home. Saloni Khosla, Head of Spatial Design at Pepperfry shares tips that might be helpful under these circumstances:

Understanding perspectives:

The overall ambiance of the space you inhabit should have flushed and neutral tones to accentuate the furniture, fittings, and finishes that define each one's uniqueness. Making a blueprint of the house and mapping out furnishings helps in understanding the other person's perspective which sows the seed of their personality which will be important in making home decor decisions further.

Speaking about everything from the colors and textures to budget and style, it is wise to understand that the more sympathetic you seem to their design needs, the more willing they will be to listen to what you want. Perspectives can be better understood by creating Pinterest boards to develop creative ideas.

Shifting can be a tedious process and is certainly a shift of pace from the comfort of your previous home. (IANS)
Shifting can be a tedious process and is certainly a shift of pace from the comfort of your previous home. (IANS)

Keep what works, chuck what doesn't:

Existing furniture is a good way to cut costs and direct those resources to the more important needs of the house. In case of any existing furniture that both roommates have, it makes sense to only keep what both of you think makes sense keeping in mind the type of house interiors desired. The rest can either be sold or donated.

Compromise goes both ways:

It is tough to compromise on the design of a room but living together comes with a fair share of it. This is why if you find it challenging to negotiate with your roommate about the big things, say, they want the kitchen to be sleek and contemporary while you want it to be Bohemian, you can ask her to take up the kitchen design while you could take on the bathroom. This will not only act as a conflict-resolver but will also give each roommate complete ownership and responsibility for the task.

Focus on functionality just as much as aesthetics:

This is especially true for first-timers. Focusing on aesthetics makes the house look good. Focusing on functionality makes the house easy to live in. Integrate both and you have an ideal home. Ample storage, and a designated and compartmentalized living space, tidy up the entire home and give it a prim and proper feel.

Don't forget to have fun:

Shifting can be a tedious process and is certainly a shift of pace from the comfort of your previous home. But when you are living with your roommate, just enjoy their company and embrace what comes as they do. Understand that your roommate will broaden your style palette and that it isn't a sacrifice.

At the end of the day, shifting is about starting fresh and having fun while doing so. Therefore it is important to take the whole shifting process as a healthy challenge. So even if you despise the hideous green chair your roommate is obsessed with, learn to ask questions about why they like it instead of sighing in acceptance. (AA/IANS)

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