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Lijjat, the cooperative of India

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New Delhi: Cooperative societies have played a significant role in the development of the Indian economy, besides empowering the women. The overwhelming success of cooperative societies can be gauged by the fact that 97 per cent of Indian villages claim to have a cooperative society run by its own villagers or by the government.

The Indian co-operative society model

An Indian co-operative society business model involves individuals of the same strata united to promote their common economic interest. It aims at betterment of the members and not on making profits. This model is mostly common among needy people who have the urge to stand on their own legs.

Unlike a company, cooperative is an organization where all the members are the stake holders and the profit is split equally among them.

The Success story of Lijjat:

Lijjat Papad is much more than a household name in India. Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad has epitomized the overwhelming story of “rags to riches”. Starting with a meager loan of Rs 80 in 1959, the cooperative registers an annual sale of a staggering Rs 301 crore now.

The unique selling proposition of the cooperative is its assurance of quality at a reasonable price. The cooperative has always ensured that every operation runs smoothly. Shri Mahila Griha Udyog Lijjat Papad members have always earned a comfortable profit and its agents get their due share.

Gandhian simplicity and ethical workplace values have spring-boarded to the zenith and made it a model for other aspiring cooperatives.

The modus operandi

A bevy of women goes to the Lijjat branch to knead dough, which is then collected by another group of women for rolling it into papads. When the first group of women comes in the morning, they taste the previous day’s production and the quality gets automatically checked. After the quality check, another set of women pack the tasted papads for distribution.

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Global presence

Lijjat has spread its wings beyond India. Exporting the product to various countries including United States, the United Kingdom, the Middle East countries, Singapore, Hong Kong and Holland, the company has clocked a turnover of Rs 10 crore. Though the cooperative does not export on its own , recognized professional merchant exporters handle the business.  At present, 30 to 35 per cent of the production of Lijjat Papad is being exported.

Recipe behind the success

Sharing of power and the Sarvodaya philosophy has helped the organization achieve such stardom. The authority decides the manner in which profit or loss should be apportioned among the members. A committee of 21 members manages the affairs of the institution. However, all decisions, major or minor, are based on consensus among members. Any single member’s objection can nullify a decision.

The cooperative started by seven women on a terrace of a building in Girgaum in Mumbai has scripted a success story because the members were pledged bound to share the destiny of each other. The tradition is still prevalent.

(Picture Courtesy: www.plus.google.com, www.psbt.org)

 

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PM Narendra Modi to Unveil National Film Museum in Mumbai

The complex includes a multipurpose hall for movie previews, social events, conferences or seminars and cultural gatherings, besides incorporating several features to make it green and eco-friendly

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PM to unveil national film museum in Mumbai. Wikimedia Commons

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will on Saturday inaugurate the National Museum of Indian Cinema (NMIC) that has come up in a 19th century heritage bungalow and a modern building in the country’s film capital, an official said here on Thursday.

A galaxy of dignitaries like Amitabh Bachchan, Akshay Kumar, Salman Khan, A.R. Rahman, David Dhawan, Rohit Shetty, Waheeda Rehman, Jeetendra Kapoor, Asha Parekh, Raveena Tandon, Pankaj Kapoor, Rakesh Mehra and others are expected to attend the opening ceremonies.

The NMIC will provide a glimpse into the Indian film history and help film students, film-makers, fans and critics to learn and understand cinema as a medium of artistic expression in the country and globally.

The museum has on display artefacts like vintage cameras, projectors, editing and recording equipment, costumes, photographs and other materials portraying the journey of Indian cinema since its dawn in 1913 with the first full-length feature film, “Raja Harishchandra” made by the legendary Dhundiraj Govind Phadke, known as Dadasaheb Phalke.

There are also film sets, props, film tapes, sound tracks, trailers, transparencies and a rich collection of film-related literature and memorabilia depicting Indian film history in a chronological order.

Designed by the National Council of Science Museums, it was first envisaged in 1997, and set up in the 19th century heritage bungalow Gulshan Mahal and in another adjacent modern five-storeyed building, spread across 12,000 sq. metres.

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Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

The museum comprises more than three dozen interactive galleries devoted to cinema and its journey from the silent era to talkies, black-and-white to colour, from the film rolls era to digital technology and a children’s activity gallery.

The NMIC project was undertaken by the state-owned Navratna public sector undertaking, NBCC (India) Ltd, and promises to be a delightful treat for historians, tourists and film buffs from all over the world thronging the country’s film headquarters.

NBCC Chairman-cum-Managing Director Anoop Kumar Mittal said the entire NMIC complex is a potential ‘film hub’ narrating the rich history of Indian cinema in the heart of south Mumbai.

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The unique design features include a unique front elevation designed with inclined structural glazing support by cable nets with spiders and a glass facade to provide a 3D view impression to the structure, said Mittal.

The complex includes a multipurpose hall for movie previews, social events, conferences or seminars and cultural gatherings, besides incorporating several features to make it green and eco-friendly. (IANS)