Sunday, April 18, 2021
Home Indian festivals Lohri : Things You Must Know About The Harvest Festival

Lohri : Things You Must Know About The Harvest Festival

Farmers in Punjab consider Lohri as their New Year in the terms of finance

BY NEHA HEGDE

The Punjabi harvest festival is called Lohri and arrives just a night before Makara Sankranti, a festival that marks the end of winter. Lohri is mostly celebrated by the Hindus and Sikhs to honor the harvested crops in winter. The harvest festival is referred to different names in different states of India, Pongal in Tamilnadu, Makara Sankranthi in Gujurat, Bengal, and Karnataka, Bihu in Assam, and Tai Pongal in Kerala.

Farmers in Punjab consider Lohri as their New Year in the terms of finance. A bonfire is lighted-up on the night of Lohri and people enjoy singing, dancing, and offering leftovers.

Lohri celebrates the winter rabi crops which are sown in winters such as Sarson (mustard leaves), sesame, whole wheat, and spinach are an integral part of the festival. It is their tradition to serve sinner after the celebration is done around the bonfire.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter to stay updated about the World news.

The winter harvests such as popcorns, peanuts, jaggery, Rewari, and gajak are distributed to all neighbors, friends, and relatives. Girls of the families dress up traditionally and perform Gidha.

“Til” means sesame and “Rohri” means jaggery and these are the traditional food of this festival. Lohri got its original name which is “Tilohri” by these two words.

Lohri
The flames of the fire during the bonfire are known to carry messages to the Sun. Pixabay

During the bonfire, families dance and enjoy famous tunes of this festival like “Sundariye Mundariye Ho.” “Dholis” present at several gatherings is another sight rendering traditional Punjabi touch to the celebrations as people enjoyed ‘Bhangra’ dancing.

Want to read more in Hindi? Checkout: राम मंदिर आंदोलन पर डॉक्युमेंट्री रिलीज

Lohri is also believed to be the longest night of the year in the Lunar Calendar. It implies the end of the coldest month of the year and indicates the arrival of the Sun as Earth now starts to turn towards the Sun. The Sun god is also worshipped during Lohri.

In the context of folklores, the flames of the fire during the bonfire are known to carry messages to the Sun which is why the day after Lohri is warm and sunny bringing an end to “gloomy” winter days. The following day is celebrated as ‘Makara Sankranti’ to mark the beginning of bright days ahead.

ALSO READ: Religious People Less Likely To Suffer Depression and Anxiety: Says Study

Foods like gajak and puffed rice and items like popcorn are thrown into the bonfire to indicate Agni- The God of Fire. It is said that these offerings are thrown in the sparkling flames to effectively impress the gods and thus seek blessings for their family and a good future.

STAY CONNECTED

19,517FansLike
362FollowersFollow
1,773FollowersFollow

Most Popular

Know About Luxor’s ‘Lost Golden City’

By- Khushi Bisht Archeologists recently unearthed a 3000-year-old Egyptian wonder known as the "Lost Golden City of Luxor," near the 'Valley of Kings', a burial...

COVID Vaccine Might Be Less Effective For People With Blood Cancer: Study

The two-dose mRNA Covid-19 vaccine may be aless effective' in people undergoing treatment for certain types of blood cancers, researchers have claimed in two new...

Oral Antiviral Drug Shows Potential Prevention Against COVID-19

An experimental oral antiviral drug has shown potential in prevention and treatment of SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing Covid-19 infections, say researchers. The antiviral -- MK-4482...

The Power Of The Placebo Effect

BY- JAYA CHOUDHARY The mind can hold tremendous power over bodies. People walking on coal without showing any signs of discomfort. Ordinary people performing superhuman...

Ashtottaram 47) OṀ MĀTRUBHŨMYAI NAMAH:

By Devakinanda Pasupuleti Ashtottaram 47) OṀ MĀTRUBHŨMYAI NAMAH: OṀ (AUM) -MAA-ṪRU-BHOO-MYAI—NA-MA-H ॐ मातृभूम्यै नमः                                            (Mātru: Mother, one who is honored or worshipped) Please Follow NewsGram on Facebook To Get Latest...

‘As A Hindu I Feel The Kumbh Mela Shouldn’t Have Taken Place’, Says Singer Sonu Nigam

Noted singer Sonu Nigam on Sunday reacted to the Kumbh Mela being made symbolic for this year due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. The...

Scott Rudin To ‘Step Back’ After Bullying Allegations

Amid mounting anger over allegations of bullying, Broadway and Hollywood producer Scott Rudin broke his silence Saturday, saying he was "profoundly sorry" and would...

How Is India’s Second Wave Of Covid-19 Different From First?

The second wave of the coronavirus pandemic in India is different from the first one in September 2020 as the rate of increase in...

Recent Comments