Monday January 21, 2019
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Madras HC sanctions stay on govt appeal against Greenpeace

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New Delhi: Madras High Court put a stay on a government order revoking Greenpeace India’s registration, remarking that the Tamil Nadu Registrar of Societies (RoS) had not followed the doctrines of natural environmental justice.

It is the sixth time in the past one year and a half that Greenpeace and its campaigners have prospered against numerous efforts to limit its tasks and finances. The government has also tried to shut it down.

The High Court has constantly been in the favour of the Indian Non-Profit Organisation (NGO). The organisation has also been expecting the court to be in favour as it claims the government’s argument to baseless and biased.

“We were confident the court would agree that Greenpeace is on sound legal footing and has done nothing wrong, notwithstanding the government’s ridiculous allegations of fraud in this instance. Our accounts are an open book and our website is there for all to inspect”, said Priya Pillai a Greenpeace volunteer in an interview with a news agency.

Notwithstanding the trials encountered by the organisation, it continues to work towards their agenda of recycling to achieve clean air, eco-friendly energy and clean water. The NGO also initiated a free application on android systems that warns people to take safeguard from hazardous levels of air pollution across the country. This is a mobile application very useful for Indian citizens with the growing rate of pollution, especially after the recent Diwali celebrations.

With triumphs like these, the organisation is gathering additional support among citizens affected or concerned about environmental distress.

The rising level of pollution from traffic emission, industrial wastes has made India the highest affected country by air pollution. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has confirmed that 13 of the top 20 worldwide cities with the poorest fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in air pollution are in India, and Delhi tops the list.

With India becoming more prone to environmental hazards, an organisation of this sort is of prime importance, and with the recent judgement Greenpeace can work towards achieving its aim.

Next Story

New Technology That Can Clean Water Twice As of Now

more than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world's population will be living in water-stressed areas.

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Novel technology cleans water using bacteria

Researchers, led by one of Indian-origin, have developed a new technology that can clean water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes, an advance that brings hope for countries like India where clean drinking water is a big issue.

According to a team from the Washington University in St. Louis, more than one in 10 people in the world lack basic drinking water access, and by 2025, half of the world’s population will be living in water-stressed areas.

The team led by Srikanth Singamaneni, Professor at the varsity, developed an ultrafiltration membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose that they found to be highly efficient, long-lasting and environment-friendly.

The membrane technology purifies water while preventing biofouling, or build up of bacteria and other harmful micro-organisms that reduce the flow of water.

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The membrane technology purifies water while preventing biofouling. VOA

For the study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, they used bacteria to build such filtering membranes.

The Gluconacetobacter hansenii bacteria is a sugary substance that forms cellulose nanofibres when in water.

The team then incorporated graphene oxide (GO) flakes into the bacterial nanocellulose while it was growing, essentially trapping GO in the membrane to make it stable and durable.

They exposed the membrane to E. coli bacteria, then shone light on the membrane’s surface.

After being irradiated with light for just three minutes, the E. coli bacteria died. The team determined that the membrane quickly heated to above the 70 degrees Celsius required to deteriorate the cell walls of E. coli bacteria.

While the bacteria are killed, the researchers had a pristine membrane with a high quality of nanocellulose fibres that was able to filter water twice as fast as commercially available ultrafiltration membranes under a high operating pressure.

When they did the same experiment on a membrane made from bacterial nanocellulose without the reduced GO, the E. coli bacteria stayed alive.

The new technology is capable of identifying and quantifying different kinds of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, as a threat to shut down water systems when it suddenly proliferates. Pixabay

While the researchers acknowledge that implementing this process in conventional reverse osmosis systems is taxing, they propose a spiral-wound module system, similar to a roll of towels.
Also Read: India Gets Assistance of Rs 3,420 Crore From Japan
It could be equipped with LEDs or a type of nanogenerator that harnesses mechanical energy from the fluid flow to produce light and heat, which would reduce the overall cost.

If the technique were to be scaled up to a large size, it could benefit many developing countries where clean water is scarce, the researchers noted. (IANS)