Monday February 19, 2018

Maharashtra Governor calls for developing drugs against lifestyle ailments

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NewsGram Staff Writer

Mumbai: Maharashtra Governor CV Rao on Saturday called upon the Indian pharmaceutical industry to develop drugs to combat lifestyle diseases like diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular ailments and tuberculosis.

Speaking at the golden jubilee celebrations of the Organisation of Pharmaceutical Producers of India (OPPI) in Mumbai, the governor said lifestyle diseases were playing havoc in the country.

Rao urged the research-based pharma industry to lay renewed thrust on research and innovation and significantly hike investments in drug development and research activities.

“The senior population in India, which is currently 90 million, would touch around 173 million in the next 10 years and the OPPI must make comprehensive plans for their physical, financial, emotional safety and well-being,” Rao said.

He lauded the OPPI for “improving the life quality of Indian and also from other under-developed and developing countries” besides partnering India’s growth and development vide technical collaborations, disease awareness programs, patient-access initiatives and drug safety efforts.

To mark the OPPI milestone, Rao felicitated eminent people like Dr Tarun Gupta, Dr J N Banerjee, Prof RD Joshi, Ranjit Shahani, Dr Prathap Reddy, Dr D B Gupta for their outstanding contributions to OPPI.

OPPI is an organisation of research-based pharma companies in the country with members like Abbott, Bayer’s, GSK, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Sanofi, etc.

(With inputs from IANS)

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Night Shifts May Raise Risk Of Diabetes

For the study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, the team examined data from more than 270,000 people, including 70,000 who provided in-depth lifetime employment information and a sub-group of more than 44,000 for whom genetic data were available

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The results showed that those with the highest genetic risk scores were almost four times as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes compared to individuals who had lower genetic risk scores. Pexels
The results showed that those with the highest genetic risk scores were almost four times as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes compared to individuals who had lower genetic risk scores. Pexels

Do you frequently work night shifts? Beware, you are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, a precursor to cardiovascular diseases, researchers have warned.

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body processes blood sugar (glucose).

The study found that people working irregular or rotating shifts with usual night shifts were 44 percent more likely to have Type 2 diabetes.

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“We see a dose-response relationship between a frequency of night shift work and Type 2 diabetes, where the more often people do shift work, the greater their likelihood of having the disease, regardless of genetic predisposition,” said Ceiine Vetter, Professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder.

In addition, compared to day workers, all shift workers were more likely to have Type 2 diabetes, except for permanent night shift workers, the researchers mentioned. Pexels
In addition, compared to day workers, all shift workers were more likely to have Type 2 diabetes, except for permanent night shift workers, the researchers mentioned. Pexels

“This helps us understand one piece of the puzzle: frequency of night shift work seems to be an important factor,” Vetter added.

For the study, published in the journal Diabetes Care, the team examined data from more than 270,000 people, including 70,000 who provided in-depth lifetime employment information and a sub-group of more than 44,000 for whom genetic data were available.

ALSO READ: 6 Foods You Should Mandatorily Avoid At Night

More than 6,000 people in the sample population had Type 2 diabetes.

Using the information on more than 100 genetic variants that are associated with Type 2 diabetes, the research team developed a genetic risk score that they used to assign a value to each participant.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the global prevalence of diabetes has nearly doubled since 1980, rising from 4.7 percent to 8.5 percent in the adult population. The majority of people with diabetes are affected by Type 2 diabetes. (IANS)

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