Friday November 15, 2019

Mallika Sherawat Wants To Be The Voice Of Women Who Don’t Have One

She wants to inspire women across the country through her story on facing her stalker in ZEE5's anthology series

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Mallika is also supporting a plant-based nutritional tour in medical schools across India. The first part started in Bhopal on July 26 and went on till August 7.
Mallika is also supporting a plant-based nutritional tour in medical schools across India. The first part started in Bhopal on July 26 and went on till August 7.

Mallika Sherawat is bold, fearless and outspoken. The actress, who works closely with an organisation that fights against human trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children, says she wants to be the voice of women who don’t have one and that activism is important for her.

She was teargassed and beaten up in her Paris apartment in 2016. She also had to deal with a “crazy terrible stalker”.

Does she fear for her life?

“I can’t stop living my life. What’s good if I don’t get to use my voice for the cause that I believe in? I believe in women empowerment and to be the voice for women who don’t have a voice.

“I get mails from Haryana… from women saying, ‘Show us the way’. They want to make something of their life. My activism is very important to me,” Mallika told IANS on the phone from Mumbai.

She wants to inspire women across the country through her story on facing her stalker in ZEE5’s anthology series, “The Story”.

Talking about the episode of the digital project, she said: “It was kind of reliving the nightmare, but it was important for me to speak up about the experience. In India, a lot of people think that the life of a famous person is very simple… but actually, it’s not. We all have our own challenges and problems.

“I had this crazy, terrible stalker. Also, what’s happening in India right now with all these gang rape cases… there is a need to take self-defence seriously.”

Recalling the incident, the “Murder” actress said: “This took place a few years ago in Mumbai. This crazy guy was against the idea of me wearing short skirts. He said ‘You are going against your culture. Women like you should be put behind bars’.

“My clothes were an obsession for him. He just couldn’t believe that a girl from Haryana could wear short skirts and that too on screen. I know that regressive mentality towards women exists, but I didn’t know that it could go this far.

“I think, for him, it was like, ‘I am going to set her right. I am going to teach her the value of wearing a sari’. He even had a gun with him. I talk about women’s rights. He just didn’t want me to speak. He hated what I stood for — independent, modern Indian women. That guy was put behind bars.”

She is positive that the audience, especially women, will relate to it because a “lot of women are facing harassment” at work and at home.

Mallika sherawat visits twitter HQ
Mallika sherawat visits twitter HQ. Pixabay

“I have faced harassment. It is a very common thing with women,” she said.

Mallika has also got the rights to adapt “The Good Wife”, an American legal and political drama TV series, for Indian audiences.

“Again, it is a women’s empowerment show. By the end of this year, we will start shooting for it. I will play the central character,” she said.

“It will be shot in India in Hindi. I am really excited to share it with the Indian audience. I think the time is right,” added the actress, who featured in the American show “Hawaii Five-0”.

Mallika has made frequent appearances on the Cannes Film Festival’s red carpet. She has also featured in Chinese films like “Time Raiders” and “The Myth”.

She feels proud that the audience abroad “absolutely loves Bollywood”.

Also read: Across Asia’s Borders, Survivors Of Human Trafficking, Dial in for Justice

“Bollywood is really making its presence felt abroad. A lot of Indian actors are working abroad. They love musicals of Bollywood as they are so unique. Now, realistic cinema is also coming from Bollywood. They help to form a good image for Bollywood.” (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s Why Women Should Not Dine After 6 PM

Women who dine late in the evening are likely to develop heart diseases

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Women should not consume higher proportionate of calories late in the evening. Pixabay

Women who consume a higher proportion of their daily calories late in the evening are more likely to be at risk of cardiovascular disease than women who do not, researchers have warned.

For the study, the research team assessed the cardiovascular health of 112 women using the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 measures at the beginning of the study and one year later.

Life’s Simple 7 represents the risk factors that people can improve through lifestyle changes to help achieve ideal cardiovascular health and include not smoking, being physically active, eating healthy foods and controlling body weight, along with measuring cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

A heart health score based on meeting the Life’s Simple 7 was computed.

“The preliminary results indicate that intentional eating that is mindful of the timing and proportion of calories in evening meals may represent a simple, modifiable behaviour that can help lower heart disease risk,” said study lead author Nour Makarem from Columbia University in the US.

During the study, participants of the study kept electronic food diaries by computer or cell phone to report what, how much and when they ate for one week at the beginning of the study and for one week 12 months later.

Women, heart disease
Women should consume less calories in the evening for a healthy heart. Pixabay

Data from the food diary completed by each woman was used to determine the relationship between heart health and the timing of when they ate.

Researchers found that, after 6 p.m. with every one per cent calories consumed heart health declined, especially for women.

These women were found more likely to have higher blood pressure, higher body mass index and poorer long-term control of blood sugar.

Similar findings occurred with every one per cent increase in calories consumed after 8 p.m.

Also Read- Study Associates Air Pollution With Heart Attack

“It is never too early to start thinking about your heart health whether you’re 20 or 30 or 40 or moving into the 60s and 70s. If you’re healthy now or if you have heart disease, you can always do more. That goes along with being heart smart and heart healthy,” said study researcher Kristin Newby, Professor at Duke University.

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 from November 16-18 in Philadelphia, US. (IANS)