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Man’s Best Friend: How Do ESAs Make You Feel Better?

Emotional support animals are a natural way to feel better

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pets
Pets give us the love and support we need to help cope with psychological conditions.

Emotional support animals improve the lives of those with mental conditions like anxiety,
depression, PTSD, and OCD.  ESAs increase well-being and mental health and help people
cope with their disabilities.  Animals provide unconditional love and support.  No matter
how bad your day was, your dog will always be happy to see you when you come home.
Even just petting an animal reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) levels and is good for
heart health.  Learn more about how ESAs make you feel better.

You Feel Less Alone

Many people suffering from psychological conditions feel isolated and alone.  Those with
autism may have trouble connecting to other people.  When you’re depressed, it’s hard to
leave the house and have the energy to hold a conversation.  Dogs, cats, and other animals
ease the feelings of isolation without judgment or demanding questions. Your ESA ( maybe
you have heard the term emotional service dog?) is right there by your side no matter what, giving you love and support even if you feel like you don’t deserve it.

The results showed that the pups' attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.
Representational Image. Pixabay

Routine

Having an emotional support animal like a dog or cat helps keep you in a routine.  Dogs
require daily walks, forcing you to get out of the house even if you do not want to.  Find out the best dog breeds for social anxiety disorders. Dogs can help you interact with other
people and are great conversation starters.  Keeping a routine is great for stability and
reducing anxiety.  If you have depression, you have to put your ESA first and give them
exercise and attention.  Learn about the best ESA dog breeds for depression.

Stress Reduction

Animals make you smile, laugh, and reduce stress through happy brain chemicals like
oxytocin and reducing stress hormones like cortisol.  Dogs encourage exercise which helps
decrease stress and boosts mood.  Playing or just petting your pet is a natural stress
reliever.  Ever notice when you get home from a long, stressful day, you start to feel better
as soon as you give your pet some attention? It’s not magic; it’s science.

Also Read- Men Do Not Forget Pain Easily as Compared to Women

Emotional support animals are a natural way to feel better.  Pets give us the love and
support we need to help cope with psychological conditions.  This love and support
increase mental health and well-being.  Emotional support animals help people feel less
alone and isolated from the world.  It can be easier to connect with animals than people
when you’re feeling down or have a condition that makes it hard to communicate your
feelings.

” Common Questions on how ESAs make you feel better? ”
” What does an ESA do? ”
” Do ESAs reduce stress? ”
” Why do ESAs make people with mental conditions feel better? “

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Children With Pets During Infancy Less Likely To Develop Allergies: Study

In another experiment, which included 249 children, it showed that the allergy rate for children growing up without a pet was 48 per cent

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Allergies
People raised in cities without pets at risk from mental illness. Pixabay

Children who live with pets when they are infants are less likely to develop allergies and other diseases later in childhood, a Swedish study found.

The study sought to learn about the possible benefits of germ exposure to infants living with pets in their home.

For the study, the researchers from the University of Gothenburg included 1,029 children who were either seven or eight years old.

In the first experiment, findings, published on the open access site, ‘PLOS ONE’, the researchers found that the incidence of allergies (which in this study included asthma, eczema, hay fever and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis) was 49 per cent for children who had not been exposed to pets as infants.

Allergies
The number fell to 43 per cent for children who had lived with a single pet as an infant and to 24 per cent for children who had lived with three pets. Pixabay

The number fell to 43 per cent for children who had lived with a single pet as an infant and to 24 per cent for children who had lived with three pets.

Also Read: Tips To Keep Pets Warm in Winter

In another experiment, which included 249 children, it showed that the allergy rate for children growing up without a pet was 48 per cent, 35 per cent for children with one pet and just 21 per cent for children who had grown up with multiple pets.

Taken together, the two datasets showed that the more exposure infants have to pets, the less likely they are to develop allergies later in life, the team concluded. (IANS)