Wednesday November 20, 2019
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Masaba Posted About Depression After Kate Spade’s Death

Masaba says there is a need to look at people with "compassion and kindness".

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Masaba Gupta Says Beauty Is A Strange Burden, Which Keeps Changing
Masaba Gupta Says Beauty Is A Strange Burden, Which Keeps Changing, Flickr

Masaba Gupta, who is popular for her out-of-the-box designs, has mourned the death of international designer Kate Spade and says it is such a “strange and damaged time we are living in”.

Spade, who created a line of handbags in the 1990s, was found dead in her apartment in New York on Tuesday. She was 55. She apparently hanged herself.

Masaba on Tuesday night wrote a post about depression and shared it on Twitter.

“Oh man, Kate Spade was one of the most successful entrepreneurs in fashion. My heart goes out to her family. Such a strange, damaged time we live in,” Gupta wrote in her post.

She added: “I don’t know what drives someone to do this but if we must learn every time we hear of someone passing in this manner, we must think harder about that friend, who said they are not okay, or even check in on an acquaintance that looked out of it.”

Picture illustrating alone girl in a crowd
Picture illustrating alone girl in a crowd, Representational image, Pixabay

Gupta, 29, said that there is a need to look at people harder with “compassion and kindness”.

“Drop your ego and reach out – even at the risk of seeming crazy or invasive. Reach out, but mean it. I don’t know what drove Kate Spade and I don’t want to speak out of turn on another note please understand. Depression, anxiety etc are very real, they are here and they are in our face like never before,” she wrote.

Also read: Healthy sleep key ward off depression later

The designer, who is the daughter of veteran actress Neena Gupta and former West Indies batsman Vivian Richards, says: “We are the most connected of generations… One call away but a million miles away in our heads, somehow there has never been a greater disconnect between human beings and we must be very conscious and aware at this time.” (IANS)

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40% Parents Struggle to see Depression Signs in Kids: Study

Most parents also believe schools should play a role in identifying potential depression, with seven in 10 supporting depression screening starting in middle school, the study said

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In boys it is previous depressive symptoms which determine subsequent suicidal ideation. Pixabay

Telling the difference between a teen’s normal ups and downs or something bigger is among the top challenges parents face while identifying depression among the youth, says a new study.

Forty per cent of parents struggle to differentiate between normal mood swings and signs of depression, while 30 per cent are tricked as their child hides his/her feelings well, according to a new national poll in the US.

The C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan, is based on responses from 819 parents with at least one child in middle school, junior high, or high school.

“In many families, the preteen and teen years bring dramatic changes both in youth behaviour and in the dynamic between parents and children,” said poll co-director Sarah Clark.

“These transitions can make it particularly challenging to get a read on children’s emotional state and whether there is possible depression,” Clark added.

According to the researchers, some parents might be overestimating their ability to recognise depression in the mood and behaviour of their own child.

An overconfident parent may fail to pick up on the subtle signals that something is amiss.

suicide, world, deaths, study
Depression is among the leading causes of disability in the U.S. and is being closely monitored by health authorities amid rising suicides nationwide. Pixabay

The poll also suggests that the topic of depression is all too familiar for middle and high school students.

One in four parents say their child knows a peer or classmate with depression, and one in 10 say their child knows a peer or classmate who has died by suicide.

This level of familiarity with depression and suicide is consistent with recent statistics showing a dramatic increase in suicide among US youth over the past decade.

Rising rates of suicide highlight the importance of recognising depression in youth.

Also Read: Study Finds No Link Between Fish Oil and Prostrate Cancer

Compared to the ratings of their own ability, parents polled were also less confident that their preteens or teens would recognise depression in themselves.

“Parents should stay vigilant on spotting any signs of potential depression in kids, which may vary from sadness and isolation to anger, irritability and acting out,” said Clark.

Most parents also believe schools should play a role in identifying potential depression, with seven in 10 supporting depression screening starting in middle school, the study said. (IANS)