Tuesday August 21, 2018
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Masaba Posted About Depression After Kate Spade’s Death

Masaba says there is a need to look at people with "compassion and kindness".

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Masaba Gupta Says Beauty Is A Strange Burden, Which Keeps Changing
Masaba Gupta Says Beauty Is A Strange Burden, Which Keeps Changing, Flickr
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Masaba Gupta, who is popular for her out-of-the-box designs, has mourned the death of international designer Kate Spade and says it is such a “strange and damaged time we are living in”.

Spade, who created a line of handbags in the 1990s, was found dead in her apartment in New York on Tuesday. She was 55. She apparently hanged herself.

Masaba on Tuesday night wrote a post about depression and shared it on Twitter.

“Oh man, Kate Spade was one of the most successful entrepreneurs in fashion. My heart goes out to her family. Such a strange, damaged time we live in,” Gupta wrote in her post.

She added: “I don’t know what drives someone to do this but if we must learn every time we hear of someone passing in this manner, we must think harder about that friend, who said they are not okay, or even check in on an acquaintance that looked out of it.”

Picture illustrating alone girl in a crowd
Picture illustrating alone girl in a crowd, Representational image, Pixabay

Gupta, 29, said that there is a need to look at people harder with “compassion and kindness”.

“Drop your ego and reach out – even at the risk of seeming crazy or invasive. Reach out, but mean it. I don’t know what drove Kate Spade and I don’t want to speak out of turn on another note please understand. Depression, anxiety etc are very real, they are here and they are in our face like never before,” she wrote.

Also read: Healthy sleep key ward off depression later

The designer, who is the daughter of veteran actress Neena Gupta and former West Indies batsman Vivian Richards, says: “We are the most connected of generations… One call away but a million miles away in our heads, somehow there has never been a greater disconnect between human beings and we must be very conscious and aware at this time.” (IANS)

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Taking Care of Mental Health Problems in Children, may Boost Parent’s Mental Health Too

When the severity of a teenagers's depression lessened, so did similar symptoms in the parent, regardless of what treatment was used: Study

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walking, was associated with good self-perceived general health
walking, was associated with good self-perceived general health. Pixabay

The bond between parent and child extends far beyond sharing similar looks or behaviours as a new study suggests that treating depression in teenagers may benefit their parents’ mental health too.

The findings suggest that when a teenager’s depression improved through treatment, so did the depression experienced by his or her parents.

“Depression is a massive public health concern that will take a variety of approaches to better manage. We believe our study is among the first to evaluate how the emotional health of a child can impact that of the parents,” said co-author Mark A. Reinecke from the Northwestern University in the US.

For the study, presented at American Psychological Association’s 126th Annual Convention, the research team involved 325 teenagers who had been diagnosed with depression and 325 of their parents or caregivers.

The teenagers were randomly assigned to one of three groups — those who received cognitive behavioural therapy, those who took anti-depressants or those who used a combination of both.

Depression
More young people today are reporting persistent feelings of sadness and hopelessness and suicidal thoughts. Flickr

The first treatment period ran for nearly one year, with an additional year of follow-up visits, the researchers said.

One-quarter of the parents who participated also reported moderate to severe levels of depression before the treatment period, the researcher added.

The treatment process was not family-based, though some portions included the parent.

The researchers found a positive ripple effect because when the severity of a teenagers’s depression lessened, so did similar symptoms in the parent, regardless of what treatment was used.

Also Read: Molecule Deficiency May Help Diagnose Severe Depression

“More young people today are reporting persistent feelings of sadness and hopelessness and suicidal thoughts,” said Kelsey R. Howard from the varsity.

“This research may help health care providers as we grapple as a nation with how to address these alarming trends,” Howard noted. (IANS)