Monday February 18, 2019
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Masaba Posted About Depression After Kate Spade’s Death

Masaba says there is a need to look at people with "compassion and kindness".

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Masaba Gupta Says Beauty Is A Strange Burden, Which Keeps Changing
Masaba Gupta Says Beauty Is A Strange Burden, Which Keeps Changing, Flickr

Masaba Gupta, who is popular for her out-of-the-box designs, has mourned the death of international designer Kate Spade and says it is such a “strange and damaged time we are living in”.

Spade, who created a line of handbags in the 1990s, was found dead in her apartment in New York on Tuesday. She was 55. She apparently hanged herself.

Masaba on Tuesday night wrote a post about depression and shared it on Twitter.

“Oh man, Kate Spade was one of the most successful entrepreneurs in fashion. My heart goes out to her family. Such a strange, damaged time we live in,” Gupta wrote in her post.

She added: “I don’t know what drives someone to do this but if we must learn every time we hear of someone passing in this manner, we must think harder about that friend, who said they are not okay, or even check in on an acquaintance that looked out of it.”

Picture illustrating alone girl in a crowd
Picture illustrating alone girl in a crowd, Representational image, Pixabay

Gupta, 29, said that there is a need to look at people harder with “compassion and kindness”.

“Drop your ego and reach out – even at the risk of seeming crazy or invasive. Reach out, but mean it. I don’t know what drove Kate Spade and I don’t want to speak out of turn on another note please understand. Depression, anxiety etc are very real, they are here and they are in our face like never before,” she wrote.

Also read: Healthy sleep key ward off depression later

The designer, who is the daughter of veteran actress Neena Gupta and former West Indies batsman Vivian Richards, says: “We are the most connected of generations… One call away but a million miles away in our heads, somehow there has never been a greater disconnect between human beings and we must be very conscious and aware at this time.” (IANS)

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Premature to Say Social Media Use Leads to Depression

Examining the role that these differences play will help clarify the ways in which social media interacts with mental health, with implications for parents, policymakers, and healthcare professionals alike, the study noted

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Multiple apps are displayed on an iPhone in New York.. VOA

Use of social media does not necessarily cause depressive symptoms later in adolescents and young adults, according to a recent research.

The study, however, showed that relatively higher depressive symptoms resulted due to more social media use later only among adolescent girls.

The latest study stands in contrast to recent claims that suggests teenagers’ use of social media could lead to depression.

“You have to follow the same people over time in order to draw the conclusion that social media use predicts greater depressive symptoms. By using two large longitudinal samples, we were able to empirically test that assumption,” said lead author Taylor Heffer from the Brock University in Canada.

For the study, the team surveyed 594 adolescents and 1,132 college undergraduates.

The results, published in Clinical Psychological Science, showed that social media use did not predict depressive symptoms later among adolescents or college undergraduates; rather, greater depressive symptoms predicted more social media use over time, but only among adolescent girls.

Depression
Depression is a common mental disorder. Flickr

“This finding contrasts with the idea that people who use a lot of social media become more depressed over time. Instead, adolescent girls who are feeling down may turn to social media to try and make themselves feel better,” said Heffer.

Overall, the research suggests that the fear surrounding social media use and its impact on mental health may be premature.

“When parents read media headlines such as ‘Facebook Depression’, there is an inherent assumption that social media use leads to depression,” added Heffer.

Also Read- Exercise Can Help Fight Against Deep Abdominal Belly Fat: Study

In addition, different groups of people use social media for different reasons including making social comparisons or while feeling down. While another group of people may use it for more positive reasons, such as keeping in contact with friends, according to the study.

Examining the role that these differences play will help clarify the ways in which social media interacts with mental health, with implications for parents, policymakers, and healthcare professionals alike, the study noted. (IANS)