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Masaba Posted About Depression After Kate Spade’s Death

Masaba says there is a need to look at people with "compassion and kindness".

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Masaba Gupta Says Beauty Is A Strange Burden, Which Keeps Changing
Masaba Gupta Says Beauty Is A Strange Burden, Which Keeps Changing, Flickr
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Masaba Gupta, who is popular for her out-of-the-box designs, has mourned the death of international designer Kate Spade and says it is such a “strange and damaged time we are living in”.

Spade, who created a line of handbags in the 1990s, was found dead in her apartment in New York on Tuesday. She was 55. She apparently hanged herself.

Masaba on Tuesday night wrote a post about depression and shared it on Twitter.

“Oh man, Kate Spade was one of the most successful entrepreneurs in fashion. My heart goes out to her family. Such a strange, damaged time we live in,” Gupta wrote in her post.

She added: “I don’t know what drives someone to do this but if we must learn every time we hear of someone passing in this manner, we must think harder about that friend, who said they are not okay, or even check in on an acquaintance that looked out of it.”

Picture illustrating alone girl in a crowd
Picture illustrating alone girl in a crowd, Representational image, Pixabay

Gupta, 29, said that there is a need to look at people harder with “compassion and kindness”.

“Drop your ego and reach out – even at the risk of seeming crazy or invasive. Reach out, but mean it. I don’t know what drove Kate Spade and I don’t want to speak out of turn on another note please understand. Depression, anxiety etc are very real, they are here and they are in our face like never before,” she wrote.

Also read: Healthy sleep key ward off depression later

The designer, who is the daughter of veteran actress Neena Gupta and former West Indies batsman Vivian Richards, says: “We are the most connected of generations… One call away but a million miles away in our heads, somehow there has never been a greater disconnect between human beings and we must be very conscious and aware at this time.” (IANS)

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Bacteria in The Gut May Lead to Anxiety, Depression

The researchers are now working to identify specific populations of bacteria involved in these processes and the molecules that the bacteria produce

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Bacteria in The Gut May Lead to Anxiety, Depression
Bacteria in The Gut May Lead to Anxiety, Depression. Pixabay

Gut bacteria plays a key role in infusing negative feelings in the brains of obese people, causing depression and anxiety, researchers say.

The findings showed that mice on a high-fat diet showed significantly more signs of anxiety, depression and obsessive behaviour than animals on standard diets.

In mice with high-fat diets, two areas of the brain, the hypothalamus, which helps to control whole body metabolism, and the nucleus accumbens, important in mood and behaviour, becomes insulin resistant.

“Your diet isn’t always necessarily just making your blood sugar higher or lower; it’s also changing a lot of signals coming from gut microbes and these signals make it all the way to the brain,” said C. Ronald Kahn, from the Joslin Diabetes Centre in the US.

“But all of these behaviours are reversed or improved when antibiotics that will change the gut microbiome were given with the high fat diet,” Kahn added.

Gut Bacteria.
Gut Bacteria. Pixabay

In the study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, the team identified the effect of the microbiome by transferring gut bacteria from experimental mice to germ-free mice which did not have any bacteria of their own.

The animals which received bacteria from mice on a high-fat diet began to show increased levels of activity associated with anxiety and obsessive behaviour.

However, those who got microbes from mice on a high-fat diet plus antibiotics did not, even though they did not receive the antibiotics themselves.

Also Read: Depression, Anxiety May Lead to Teeth Loss

The researchers are now working to identify specific populations of bacteria involved in these processes and the molecules that the bacteria produce.

“If we could modify those bacteria, either by putting in more beneficial bacteria or reducing the number of harmful bacteria, that might be a way to see improved behaviour,” Kahn noted. (IANS)

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